Follow us on
Connect

Posts tagged Weekend Roundup

Weekend Roundup: HarperCollins/Harlequin, Dead Novels, and more
May 4, 2014 | 6:54 pm

Kindle Daily Deal: Spider Woman's Daughter (and others) -- HarperCollins Acquisition of Harlequin and What it Means for Readers (Dear Author) I saw a number of people speculate that the sale of Harlequin had to do with Harlequin being in trouble financially and while Harlequin has seen decreasing profits in the recent years, it was still a healthy and profitable division of Torstar. -- The Novel is Dead (and This Time it's for Real) (The Guardian) Literary fiction used to be central to the culture. No more: in the digital age, not only is...

Weekend Roundup: Amazon Wants to Give Away Its Rumored Smartphone for Free
September 7, 2013 | 11:53 am

Amazon Amazon Wants to Give Away Its Rumored Smartphone for Free (Gizmodo) We've been hearing rumors about Amazon developing its own smartphone for years. Now, a new report from Wall Street Journal vets Jessica Lessin and Amir Efrati not only says the launch is imminent but also claims it'll have a very very consumer-friendly price tag: $0. * * * It's Almost Time to Throw Out Your Books (Tech Crunch) The near-unthinkable has happened. The dinosaurs are finally evolving. The publishing industry’s long war against technology, the future, and its customers may finally be coming to a close. * * * Doing Time: Stories of Juvenile Delinquents (Book Riot) I finished watching Orange is the New Black a few...

Mega Weekend Roundup: Why the future of books is safe; new Salinger books on the way; much more
August 25, 2013 | 11:01 am

booksNew biography claims new Salinger books due out (ABC News via AP) The authors of a new J.D. Salinger biography are claiming they have cracked one of publishing's greatest mysteries: What "The Catcher in the Rye" novelist was working on during the last half century of his life. * * * Elmore Leonard's 10 Rules for Writing (KSDK via Detroit Free Press) These are rules I've picked up along the way to help me remain invisible when I'm writing a book, to help me show rather than tell what's taking place in the story. * * * Why it matters that you can't own an electronic...

Weekend Roundup: Twitter fights; 7 sci-fi publishing misconceptions; and more
August 24, 2013 | 9:20 am

Weekend RoundupRemembering Elmore Leonard, A Writer Who Hated Literature (NPR) Elmore Leonard was a writer who hated — and I don't mean disliked; Elmore had a contempt for putting pretty clothes on hard, direct words, so I mean hated — literature, or at least what he believed a lot of people mean when they say liter-a-ture, as if it were a Members Only club. * * * The 7 Most Common Misconceptions About Science Fiction Publishing (i09) Science fiction book publishers sail the multiverse like a fleet of unstoppable hyper-cruisers. And many of us dream of being beamed up to one of these motherships. But...

Weekend Roundup: 7 literary hoaxes, 10 unreliable narrators, 7 Edinburgh book fest souvenirs, and more
August 18, 2013 | 11:53 am

hoaxesMy Edinburgh Book Festival Experience in 7 Souvenirs (Adam Marek) I just got back from three days at the Edinburgh International Book Festival where I was talking about The Stone Thrower at an event with Rodge Glass. It was my first time there and I was overwhelmed by the size of it. * * * 7 Sci-fi Literary and Journalistic Hoaxes that Readers Believed (io9) The idea of sophisticated life on the moon might seem absurd today, but when a story about lunary civilization appeared in newspapers in 1835, many wondered if it could be true. And that's hardly the only scifi story readers have found credible enough to believe. *...

Weekend Roundup: Ubuntu makes history; The Strand gets snarky; Neil Gaiman gets his own road; and more
August 17, 2013 | 10:04 am

A sign at The Stand Bookstore in ManhattanHow The Strand sells print books to ebook readers (Boing Boing) Avi Solomon snapped this pic of the window display at NYC bookstore The Strand lauding the virtues of their "Real books priced lower than ebooks," including the fact that you can read them during take-off and landing. * * * 10 Forgotten Classics You Need to Read (The Huffington Post) They are called classics for a reason, as I discovered after reading about 400 novels for my new book, The Novel, An Alternative History: 1600-1800 (Bloomsbury). Thousands of novels were published around the world during these two centuries as it gradually overcame poetry and the drama to...

Weekend Roundup: Landing a library job, the romantic smell of chocolate, and more
August 4, 2013 | 1:22 pm

Weekend RoundupHow to Land a Library Job (Publishers Weekly) I don’t claim to be an expert in much, but when it comes to securing a library job I’ve got hard-won advice worth sharing. For much of my career I suffered from a kind of librarian wanderlust, switching jobs every two or three years, which pretty much means that I spent my first 20 years in this profession engaged in a continuous job search. * * * The Old Reader to Remain Open Under New Management (The Digital Reader) It looks like the announcement of the imminent demise of The Old Reader may have been premature. There’s a...

Weekend Roundup: Amazon declares war; the bizarre art of binding books in human skin; 19 book cover clichés; and more
July 28, 2013 | 8:00 am

Weekend RoundupBREAKING NEWS: Amazon 'declares war' on the book industry (Melville House) Has the vicious end-game scenario we discussed just yesterday — whereby a government-sanctioned Amazon.com makes its move to cement its position as the most colossal monopoly in publishing history, and to savor the rewards — begun unfolding, and rapidly at that? That’s what a special weekend edition of Shelf Awareness surmises. * * * The Bizarre Art of Binding Books in Human Skin (Mental Floss) Helpful as its developments are, the field of modern medicine can be macabre, sickening, and even downright strange. We’ve left the leeches and holy water in the Middle Ages (for the most part), but some of...

Weekend Roundup: E-books on the fly; textbook publishers; Google’s translation technology; and more
July 27, 2013 | 11:44 am

e-booksTextbook publishers revamp ebooks to fight used market (NBC News) A booming market in recent years for selling and renting used college textbooks has saved students across the United States a ton of cash. But it has put textbook publishers in a bind. They don't make a cent unless students buy their books new. * * * New Mobile and Online Library Service 'Hoopla' Does Everything But Ebooks (DBW) A new digital library services vendor, Hoopla, is out of beta and is now operational at a handful of libraries. The company gives access to libraries and patrons video, music and audio books — but...

Weekend Roundup: The mini-memoir is a new and welcome e-book trend
July 21, 2013 | 8:19 am

e-bookThe mini-memoir: a new and welcome ebook trend (The Guardian) It may surprise readers of Howard Jacobson's latest novel, Zoo Time, a thinly disguised rant against modern literature, to learn that its famously fogeyish author has written an ebook. The Swag Man, published by American Jewish magazine Tablet, is a 31-page mini-memoir combining childhood tales of 1940s and 50s Manchester with a portrait of Frank Cohen, the multi-millionaire art collector who started his career working for Jacobson's market-trader father. * * * JK Rowling unmasked: the lawyer, the wife, her tweet - and a furious author (The Telegraph) It began with a barely literate tweet. At 11.34pm, on...

Weekend Roundup: Here’s the other e-book pricing problem…
July 20, 2013 | 8:00 am

e-bookThe Other eBook Pricing Problem (Huffington Post) While the e-book world takes a minute to digest the court ruling finding Apple conspired with book publishers to jack up the price of e-books to consumers, it's worth noting that there is another e-book pricing battle going on. * * * Google Play Books Now Available in 9 New European Countries (Good e-Reader) Google Play Books has expanded into nine new countries today, bringing their total footprint to 26. Residents in Denmark, Czech Republic, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, and Sweden can now access millions of free and paid eBooks. * * * Signed First Edition of JK...

Weekend Roundup: Tel Aviv gets a beach library; Miami-Dade County may lose 42 libraries; free productivity apps from Amazon
July 14, 2013 | 10:41 am

libraryTel Aviv Gets First Beachside Library (Gadling) Need a good beach read? Visitors to Tel Aviv's Metzizim Beach can now borrow books for reading on the sand. The city has launched the first beachside library, providing over 500 free book rentals in five languages, including English, Hebrew, Arabic, French and Russian. * * * JK Rowling Revealed as Writer of Crime Novel (NPR) An ex-military man tries his hand at writing, publishes a debut detective novel, and wins critical acclaim. But here's the twist in the tale: The true identity of the author is none other than "Harry Potter" creator J.K. Rowling. * * * Miami-Dade County May Shutter 42 Public...

Weekend Roundup: 5 ways to save book publishing; marathon writing sessions; Neil Gaiman (maybe) breaks a world record; and more
July 13, 2013 | 8:30 am

publishingSave 1,100 vintage science fiction books from destruction! (i09) Onondaga Public Library in Syracuse, New York, has an enormous collection of roughly 1,100 vintage books in science fiction, mystery and "other genres." But apparently, there isn't enough interest to keep them in circulation. So they're asking people to propose what should be done with them. * * * Neil Gaiman possible breaks book signing world record, doesn't recommend it (Tor blog) Not content with a New York Times chart-topping novel in The Ocean At The End Of The Lane, author Neil Gaiman might also have scooped a world record for the number of books signed in a single sitting—though it’s not an...

Weekend Roundup: Cover designs for books that don’t exist, how to write the perfect post, and more
July 7, 2013 | 9:00 am

Weekend RoundupCover designs for books that don't exist (but should) io9 As part of his Masters of Branding study at the School of Visual Arts, Tyler Adam Smith is creating 100 covers for books that should be written, from goofy snarks at popular authors to imagined sequels to beloved books. * * * As Competition Wanes, Amazon Cuts Back Discounts (NYT) Jim Hollock’s first book, a true-crime tale set in Pennsylvania, got strong reviews and decent sales when it appeared in 2011. Now “Born to Lose” is losing momentum — yet Amazon, to the writer’s intense frustration, has increased the price by nearly a third. * * * Reading, writing may...

Weekend Roundup: Royal librarian wanted to look after Queen’s 125,000 titles
July 6, 2013 | 11:35 am

Weekend RoundupWanted: Royal Librarian to Look After the Queen's 125,000 Titles (InfoDocket) The Royal Collection is advertising for a librarian to run the Royal Library at Windsor Castle for £53,000 per year. * * * Sony Launches New Affiliate Program for E-Books (Good e-Reader) Sony has officially announced its first ever ebook affiliate program that will give people a chance to make money on digital sales. * * * 4 Reasons Barnes & Noble Failed the Nook (Babble) Another quarter, another huge loss for Barnes and Noble, Inc. This time it is in the tune of 118.6 million dollars. * * * Modern life means children miss out on the pleasures...

Weekend Roundup: Digital rights protection and the future of writing
June 30, 2013 | 10:52 am

Weekend Roundup3 Reasons Why Facebook Can't Replace Your Author Website (Jane Friedman) I’ve occasionally been asked by authors at conferences: Why not just use Facebook? Isn’t that where everyone is spending their time already? Why would people visit my site? Why bother with all the effort of establishing a site, which, if it becomes dusty or out-of-date, could be more damaging than no website at all? * * * Digital rights protection and the future of writing (The Guardian) SiDiM, an ingenious new rights protections system, may point the way to the experimental literature of the future. Germany's FraunhoferInstitute recently revealed that it is working on a new digital...

Weekend Roundup: Quick-to-market e-books are now the norm, not the exception
June 29, 2013 | 10:46 am

Weekend RoundupQuick-To-Market Ebooks Now Norm, Not Exception (Forbes) What made ["Linsanity"] by sportswriter Alan Goldsher from digital publishing house and platform Vook so shocking was that it took less than six days to write (72 hours), produce (36 hours) and publish (less than 24 hours). * * * Richard Russo Gives E-Publishing A Try (NPR) Richard Russo, the writer who won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for his book Empire Falls, published a new novel six months ago. If you're wondering how you missed it, it might be because Russo chose not to publish with a traditional publisher. * * * Mother of teen jailed for Facebook post speaks to WSWS...

wordpress analytics