Follow us on
Connect

Posts tagged video

TED Talks: How Books Can Open Your Mind (Video)
June 1, 2013 | 11:30 am

TED TalksFor anyone who hasn't yet had a chance to watch the video of Lisa Bu's beautiful TED Talks lecture about the power of books, and the life-altering affect they had on her own life, give yourself the gift of clicking on the video below; it's just six minutes and 17 seconds long. I don't know if any of you will feel the same way, but the next time I happen to find myself stuck in a reading rut, I plan to sit back and give this video another close look. (Lisa Bu, by the way, is TED's content distribution manager. Her...

[Video] First Look at the Hisense Sero 7 Pro Tablet
May 28, 2013 | 4:00 pm

Ever since Google released the Nexus 7, it has been a challenge for other companies to release low-priced tablets with similar specs. One of the latest competitors to enter the fray is Hisense. Perhaps best known for televisions, Hisense just released a couple Android tablets available exclusively at Walmart. The Sero 7 Pro and the Sero 7 LT cost $149 and $99 respectively. The Sero 7 Pro has specs that are on par with the Nexus 7, but it even manages to offer features Google’s tablet doesn’t have. Here is a rundown of the Sero 7 Pro’s specs: • Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean • 1.3GHz Nvidia Tegra 3 processor • 1GB...

The Longest Word in the English Language Takes 3.5 Hours to Pronounce
May 10, 2013 | 2:47 pm

Longest Word in the English LanguageYes, this is a few months old, but nevertheless, a kindly tip o' the hat goes out to GadgeTell editor Matthew Marchesano, who just alerted me to the bizarre YouTube video we've embedded for you below. The video features Dmitry Golubovskiy (the CEO of Esquire Russia, interestingly enough) reciting the chemical name of Titin. Apparently, it's either the longest word in the English language or the longest world in any language; it's made up of a mind-bending 189,819 letters and takes 213 minutes to pronounce. As some YouTube commenters have pointed out, Golubovskiy begins the 3.5-hour-long video with a respectably clean-shaven look; by the video's end,...

Wondering what to do with all those cell phone photos and digital videos? A new e-book has the answer.
April 16, 2013 | 5:56 pm

e-bookMike McEnaney spent nearly 10 years working as both an editor and a publisher of B2B photography and digital photography magazines for North American Publishing Company (NAPCO), the same organization that owns and operates both TeleRead and the Technology Tell network of websites. Very recently, though, McEnaney struck out on his own. And somehow, along with fellow journalist Greg Scoblete, he has already managed to launch Your Digital Life, a website about the digital photography revolution. McEnaney and Scoblete's latest project, however, is an e-book, also about the world of digi-photography. From Fleeting to Forever: Enjoying & Preserving Your Digital Photos and Videos, as...

A Commercial Message from the First ‘Honest’ Cable Company (NSFW Video)
March 29, 2013 | 3:35 pm

It’s probably safe to say that we’ve all dealt with our fair share of ridiculousness, bestowed complimentary-style from our local Internet service providers. Hidden fees, promotions that are too good to be true, bad or weak Internet connections, frustrating customer service reps, forced up-selling, etc., etc., and the list goes on… A comedy troupe that makes short YouTube videos and refers to itself as Extremely Decent Films published the following video earlier in the week. Although it’s an obvious exaggeration of the truth, at the same time it really isn’t. What’s alarming, in fact, is just how much of the content in this video is real...

Morning Links — Meet the Pyrus Mini
March 2, 2013 | 9:46 am

morning links Pyrus MiniPyrus Mini eBook reader Review (The E-Book Reader) Publisher Pulls Jonah Lehrer's "How We Decide" From Stores (The Daily Beast) Unglue.it and Open Book Publishers Announce New Crowdfunding Campaign (Info Docket) As tablets boom, e-readers feel the blast (CNN) PressBooks Goes Open Source To Let Authors Create Book Sites In Seconds (TechCrunch) Kindle Daily Deals: Deck Z: The Titanic by Chris Pauls ...

Want a pair of Google Glass specs? Here’s how to get ’em…
February 20, 2013 | 11:08 am

So we’re all hip to Google’s latest consumer mega-project, Glass, right? The company that's synonymous with ‘looking things up on the Web’ hasn’t released much information on its Glass project lately—not since they opened pre-orders to developers and media at their 2012 I/O event. A New York City resident who describes himself as a "wearable computing and augmented reality enthusiast" spotted Google co-founder Sergey Brin rocking a test pair on a NYC subway earlier in the year; supposedly another hundred or so pairs were out there being tested at the time. In the meantime, Google has given us plebeians a little Google Glass taster in...

Amazon Kindle Fire HD One-Ups iPad Retina Screen in New Ad (Video)
February 6, 2013 | 12:26 pm

Amazon Kindle Fire HD“You may not be able to tell the difference,” says the advertisement’s narrator, as both the iPad and the Kindle Fire HD sit side-by-side displaying the same images. “But your wallet definitely can.” Amazon’s new 30-second ad draws the comparison in screen resolution between the iPad and the (new, larger) Fire HD 8.9-inch screen. Visually, the Fire looks awesome. Actually, both tablet screens do. I feel that strictly based on just screen clarity, sure, either would be a sufficient choice for new tablet owners. But the Kindle Fire HD's $299 price tag sure does appear as the ‘nice price’ alongside Apple’s $499...

CNET video briefly compares tablets, Kindle as holiday gifts
November 22, 2011 | 11:37 pm

CNET has a 3-minute video that bills itself as a “Buyer’s Guide” for tablets and e-readers, though it primarily focuses on tablets, and mostly the more expensive tablets—the iPad, the Galaxy S, and Sony’s Android tablet (which I hadn’t heard of before). It paints this trio of $499 tablets as the main attraction for buyers this holiday season, then spends a little time discussing the Amazon Kindle and Kindle Fire as alternatives. In the video, CNET’s Donald Bell refers to the Kindle Fire as a “good enough product”—essentially a device that will work well as an e-reader and...

Khan Academy can hook students on learning
November 16, 2011 | 1:38 am

khanacademyThis in-depth Wired feature article by Clive Thompson is a few months old, but I ran across it in an old print issue of Wired Magazine today at work and was completely fascinated. It does not have anything to do with e-books directly, perhaps, but is a great example of how new electronic media can be used for educational purposes. Salman Khan, a three-time MIT graduate with a Harvard MBA, was inspired while tutoring cousins in 2004 to begin creating educational YouTube videos along with self-testing software to help students learn from them. Before he knew it, thousands...

New application lets you “read” movies on your Kindle
July 11, 2011 | 6:30 am

20110710-124816.jpgAnyone familiar with the latest crop of EInk readers knows that there's no good way to display animation or video in a satisfactory way. BBC developer Mark Longstaff-Tyrrell's "iPlayer for Kindle" (named after the BBC's streaming video player) doesn't solve that problem, but it humorously sidesteps it by converting video into a series of captioned screenshots--creating a sort of instant storyboard using the video's own closed captioning data. The resulting file can be loaded onto an ereader and read like a comic. Via GigaOm...

Star Trek digital download expiration: Why should media be like milk?
December 22, 2010 | 8:15 am

star-trek-blu-ray-jj-abramsWhile this is not specifically about e-books, it is about an experience in transitioning from physical to digital media, and it should provide a lesson to all fields that are taking these steps—including books to e-books. A number of movies, especially titles from Paramount or Disney (such as Pixar’s Wall•E), have been coming with an “extra third disc” lately, containing a DRM-girt digital copy which can be transferred either to iTunes or Windows Media Player. This saves the buyer the trouble of ripping the thing, and lets the studio charge a little extra and feel they can keep some...

Libraries will survive, YouTube video proclaims
November 10, 2010 | 3:37 pm

It’s no surprise that libraries are coming under increasing budget pressures, both in the US and the UK. If e-book publishers can ever get their act together so that libraries can make them available to more readers, the zero-marginal-cost nature of e-books plus the savings in physical space might be helpful in reducing some of those pressures. But in the meantime, one Virginia library system has produced a hilarious short film and music video to make it clear that, even in the midst of disheartening budgetary pressures, libraries will survive. ...

Om Malik: Old media need to see new picture
October 23, 2010 | 10:28 am

om_malik On his GigaOm blog, Om Malik takes on the old media vs. new media dichotomy that has been showing up in so many places over the last few years. The main example he cites is the recent case of television broadcasters blocking Google TV from accessing their content (in much the same way Hulu’s TV network sources forced it to block Boxee last year), but he also mentions the music industry’s problems and the “death of newspapers”. When I look at these industries and the failure — or impending failure — of these institutions,...

The music event: Why Apple is streaming it, and how to watch without Apple
September 1, 2010 | 11:59 am

appleguitar[1] A couple of further notes about Apple’s event, due to start in just over an hour. Leander Kahney at Cult of Mac has an exclusive tip from an insider who explains that the streaming process is going to serve as a stress test for Apple’s new server farm, which will later be used to stream a version of iTunes for iOS devices. Kahney notes: Some have speculated that Apple is streaming the show to thwart livebloggers, who may have sabotaged Jobs’ iPhone 4 keynote at Apple’s WWDC event in June. Problems with the venue’s...

Apple releases iTunes 9.2.1, iBooks 1.1.1
July 19, 2010 | 7:44 pm

A number of news sites, such as Engadget, are reporting that Apple has released paired updates of iTunes 9.2.1 and iBooks 1.1.1. The iTunes update is largely a bugfix issue, according to its patch notes, but Crunchgear calls the iBooks release a “major update,” adding dictionary lookup of words and improvements to in-line images and PDF viewing. It also includes support for audio and video content in e-books. Given that a lack of dictionary lookup prompted some grumbling when iBooks first came out, the addition should please some of the app’s critics. Of course, the problem...

iPad review: The Unboxing
April 13, 2010 | 3:54 pm

At about 3 p.m. Tuesday afternoon, the 16-gigabyte iPad I will be reviewing for TeleRead arrived. I unboxed it, and videotaped the unboxing below. One thing I should note is that, despite what I said in the video, it turned out afterward that the iPad did indeed have a full charge when I pulled it out of the box, so I was able to get started using it right away. I will give my full thoughts on that in another post. For now, here is the video. (At time of posting, the video was still being processed. Wait...

wordpress analytics