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Posts tagged subscriptions

Members-Only Bookstores: What Would Make You Pay?
August 1, 2013 | 10:22 am

bookstoreBook Riot has a great little article up exploring the concept of a members-only bookstore. As the article explains, this idea has been floated around (most recently by Bloomberg News, whom they cite) as a way to 'save' the bricks-and-mortar bookstore against showrooming, the practice of customers coming in to browse, then going home and ordering it online for cheaper. Author Jeff O'Neal doesn't find the Bloomberg article's suggestions very compelling, but does go on to list a few ideas of his own—not for a 'members-only' bookstore per se, but for services a regular bookstore could offer that people might find worth getting...

Magazines could benefit by going to monthly subscriptions
January 22, 2012 | 10:15 pm

On paidContent, Gregory Galant suggests a way that the magazine industry could help itself stay afloat that does not involve making an iPad app. He points out that in its focus on digital, the industry seems to be ignoring certain other aspects of the overall magazine customer service experience—most notably the subscription process. Galant reports that his own experience resubscribing to a magazine involved being billed on an actual physical invoice that came in the mail. “In Japan you can buy a coke from a vending machine with your phone,” Galant points out. “The magazine industry’s still mailing invoices?”...

Bookstore sells book subscriptions with personalized recommendation service
November 22, 2011 | 11:55 pm

justtherightbookOn Publishing Perspectives, Rachel Aydt has an interesting story about a bookseller who has decided to try to make use of the Internet in an unusual way to sell more books. Roxanne Coady, owner of R. J. Julia Booksellers in Madison, Connecticut, has a personalized reading recommendation and subscription service called Just The Right Book.com. The service works by having prospective readers take a survey to find out their tastes in reading, and then the bookstore staff selecting a personalized recommendation. Survey takers can then subscribe to a tiered subscription system, with prices ranging from $85 per year for...

SFF magazine experiments with freemium model on Kindle Store
August 2, 2011 | 5:13 pm

The magazine "Fantasy & Science Fiction," which has been around for over 60 years, is trying out a new way to sell copies: it's going to start giving away the nonfiction sections, plus one fiction story, from each issue for free through the Kindle Store, while offering a paid subscription (at $1/month) for the full issue. In some ways, this is sort of like using the Kindle Store as an email list marketing tool—get users to sign up for the free stuff, then remind them regularly that there's new content for sale. But another analogue may be the freemium...

The New Yorker reports 100,000 read it on iPad
August 1, 2011 | 1:15 pm

newyorkerCondé Nast’s magazine The New Yorker has released sales figures for its iPad magazine edition. It claims 100,000 iPad readers, 20,000 of whom have bought a $59.99 yearly subscription. The bulk of those readers are made up of 75,000 print subscribers who have taken advantage of the bundling offer that allows them to download the e-magazine for free, and the other five thousand buy single weekly issues for $4.99 each. The New York Times reports that The New Yorker has followed a different strategy from other iPad magazines that emphasize graphics and multimedia. The New Yorker has always been...

Subscription-based ebookseller 24Symbols releases iPad app
July 27, 2011 | 11:00 am

The Spanish company, which launched earlier this month, has just announced a free iPad app. The app uses a sliding pane interface similar to Twitter's iPad app, but for now it's pretty bare bones. The same might be said for the company's book selection at the present, at least based on the comment a reader named Michael left on our earlier post. He wrote: Near as I could tell, almost all of their content consists of English-language works in the public domain. Covers for those books cleverly use some sort of random pattern generator. There are a few Spanish-language books with...

24 Symbols co-founder explains why publishers should consider an e-book subscription service
July 19, 2011 | 12:07 pm

And speaking of cloud-based subscription models for e-reading, Publishing Perspectives has another company-founder-written column. Justo Hidalgo, co-founder of 24Symbols (which we covered here and here), writes about the cloud-based subscription model of his company and how he believes it can turn pirates into paying customers. Hidalgo points out that the music and movie industries have shown that trying to fight piracy is a fairly futile, and that pirates are usually dedicated fans who want more control over the way they consume their media. (Which makes sense, really—why would you pirate something you didn’t want?) He thinks that publishers...

Philadelphia newspaper to introduce subsidized Android tablets
July 12, 2011 | 11:53 am

In a news conference yesterday afternoon, the Philadelphia Media Network, owner of the newspapers The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, announced plans to beta test a subsidized tablet subscription offer to readers this August. So far the publisher hasn't named which Android tablet will be offered, or how much the combo deal will cost; those details will be made public in the next 4-6 weeks. However, the blog Liliputing.com attended the event and confirmed that at launch the tablet will be a Wi-Fi only model. Here's more info from Liliputing's coverage: If you were to buy digital subscriptions to both newspapers...

The Times of London reportedly has 100,000 paid digital subscribers
July 6, 2011 | 11:25 am

Ever since Rupert Murdoch's The Times erected a paywall a year ago, observers have been curious about whether it could bring in enough paying readers with such a strict no-free-content policy. This week, AdNews reported that the newspaper "now has 101,036 people signed up to its digital platforms including website, iPad and kindle wireless reading device"—a 28% increase from February's tally of 79,000. This time last year, there were reports that nobody was going past the registration page (not even print subscribers with free access), with one person guesstimating that less than 30,000 readers had subscribed to the website or the...

New York Times iPad app outage Monday angered paying subscribers
July 6, 2011 | 9:43 am

On Monday, Network World reported, an update to the New York Times iPad app caused the app to stop working for its users. This would be annoying in and of itself, but the icing on the cake is that iPad readers have to pay subscription fees starting at $20 per month to access the paper that way. Many subscribers were displeased, to say the least. and it surely did not help matters that this happened on a holiday weekend when most staff would be out of the office. The app was fixed sometime on Tuesday, and presumably subscribers are...

Joe Wikert calls for a way to subscribe to an author’s collected output
July 5, 2011 | 10:04 am

"Why can't I subscribe to an author?" asks O'Reilly's Joe Wikert in a post on his personal Kindleville blog last week. He points out that while you can gather all the RSS feeds, Google alerts, and hashtag searches you like, it's not the most efficient way to follow a specific writer's work. Here at Teleread we've highlighted a couple of websites that offer a related service. Book Buzzes watches Amazon and alerts you when an author has a new book coming out, while BookWatch is an iOS app that performs a similar service for iBooks. But those are linked to...

Angry Robot rolls out all-you-can-read annual ebook subscription
July 4, 2011 | 11:15 am

Sci-fi/fantasy publisher Angry Robot Books has announced a new annual subscription model for its ebook store. For £69, you get every new release for the next twelve months, which AR promises will consist of at minimum 24 titles. For books that are part of a series, subscribers will be able to purchase the earlier titles at a 30% discount (although the discount is only good for one use, apparently). Although the editions are in EPUB format, they're DRM-free so you can convert them via Calibre if you happen to need another format. Via The Bookseller...