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Posts tagged publicity

Writers, here’s how to time your social media self-promotion blitz
November 18, 2014 | 12:25 pm

For those of you writer folks out there who have defied the wrath of Jonathan Franzen and opted for social media self-promotion as a valid way to publicize your latest epic (self-published or otherwise), here's a useful infographic that details the all-important question of when to Tweet or Share. Courtesy of KISSmetrics, you can work out your social media tactics across all the North American timezones, with some data points applicable to other markets as well. For instance, it's fairly obvious that "Most Facebook sharing is done on Saturday" is likely to remain true for most Western markets, although the...

Top tips on Tweets with the Top Ten Twitter writers
May 28, 2014 | 12:25 pm

Follow TeleRead on Twitter by clicking hereWith all the Jonathan Franzen-style bleating about the grind of promoting yourself through Twitter and other social media, it's worth highlighting an instance when someone sums up what actually works for Tweeting writers. After all, if you're going to be “absolutely coerced into this constant self-promotion,” at least make sure that you're doing it right, yeah? In "10 authors who are brilliant at Twitter," The Guardian Books Blog groups together its pick of the masters (and mistresses) of the new medium. Joyce Carol Oates is one author who need make no apology for Tweeting as well as writing. You could reasonably...

Waterstones LEGO literature: Probably the best promotional wheeze for literature ever – maybe
February 18, 2014 | 12:07 pm

UK bookstore chain Waterstones has come up with one of the most visually delightful promotional ideas for literature in a long while. "To celebrate the launch of The LEGO Movie tomorrow, we’re playing with plastic bricks," the Waterstones blog declares. "And we want your help recreating your favourite booky moments in brick form." The iconic picture that everyone's sharing for this competition is The Red Wedding, from George R.R. Martin's A Storm of Swords. And it's worth it:   Make no mistake, this jape has cultural cred. Here's the climatic battle between Arthur and Mordred from Sir Thomas Malory's  Le Morte d’Arthur.   Waterstones is inviting readers...

The writer as entrepreneur: Old news?
January 30, 2014 | 4:30 pm

In the UK Bookseller's Futurebook section, Tom Chalmers asks: "Where to put the entrepreneur in publishing?" with particular emphasis on the more entrepreneurial aspects of self-publishing. In these digitally disrupted times, it seems, the entrepreneurial spirit is a panacea for the industry's ills. [caption id="" align="alignright" width="216"] Would have tweeted too[/caption] "The need for urgent change is now, in the majority of places, accepted, as is the understanding that much innovation and new drive comes from entrepreneurs," Chalmers says. "But if we have entrepreneurs, how best to use them? The answer is slightly more complicated than just a welcome mat and ‘let...

The smarm debate continued: It’s not about the Internet … or is it?
December 20, 2013 | 10:28 am

The literary feud about snark versus smarm kicked off at the end of this year seems set to splutter on well into 2014. Maureen Dowd, in the New York Times Sunday Review, picked it up in a piece entitled "Bigger Than Bambi," referring to the now-notorious Bambi Rule: "If you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothing at all." And, she concluded, "such prettifying is consistent with a culture dominated by an Internet concerned mainly with marketing techniques." Although I applaud Dowd's decision to stand by snark against the saccharin surge of smarm, I have to differ on that point -...

Anti-lessons in promotion for writers, the Colin Wilson way
December 12, 2013 | 10:25 am

colin wilsonIn the aftermath of the death of noted English writer, mystic, and eternal outsider Colin Wilson, when, as Nick Mamatas remarked, the dearth of good death notices showed that the newspapers didn't have canned obits ready to go for the inevitable day, The Independent has run a handy guide on to how to achieve literary obscurity, Wilson style. For all self-publishing, self-promoting and otherwise fame-hungry writers out there, it's a useful shortlist - but perhaps one that one can take issue with. Which is what I'm going to do, right now. So here is Terence Blacker's list, with qualifiers and exceptions...

UK book publicity goes sub-parody with Biteback Publishing Stephen Ward is Innocent, OK launch
December 4, 2013 | 4:34 pm

biteback publishingFollowing the imaginary author online radio station publicity stunt for the non-book S released under the auspices of "creator" J.J. Abrams, we have another English book promotion exercise that stretches the limits of the credible - and tests the boundaries of the emetic. This time, it's the launch of Stephen Ward is Innocent, OK by Geoffrey Robertson QC, with an accompanying pledge to launch an appeal to ... well, clear Stephen Ward ... and ... well ... an accompanying musical from Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber. (Disclaimer: I am making absolutely no judgment on the guilt or innocence of Stephen Ward. All...

Want a job in resume publishing?
November 24, 2013 | 12:30 pm

Just appeared on Publishing Perspectives is a piece entitled "Want a Job in Publishing? Why Not Publish Your Resume as a Book," from guest contributor and publicist Andy Reynolds, who has his own website at http://www.andyreynoldsresume.com, about how he faced the challenge of downsizing and redundancy from a publishing house by publishing his own resume himself - as a coffee table book. "Last June I suddenly lost a great job as the VP of Marketing & Publicity at a visual book publisher due to necessary downsizing. I was crushed to find myself derailed from what had been a great career trajectory," Reynolds explains,...

Good Morning Canongate, as book promotion goes broadcast
October 25, 2013 | 4:57 pm

canongateAny eager and dewy-eyed self-publishers convinced that Kindle Direct Publishing has put them on the same footing as the book majors might want to take a close look at Canongate's latest promotional wheeze. The company has launched Radio Straka, a web-based audio broadcast station transmitting the work of fictional "towering figure of twentieth-century literature and culture" V.M. Straka, a pivotal character in the upcoming novel S by J.J. Abrams and Doug Dorst. I'm sorry, who? "Emmy-Award-winning filmmaker J.J. Abrams has produced, directed, or written films and television shows including Fringe, Lost, Alias, Felicity, Star Trek, Cloverfield, Mission: Impossible, and more," according...

Morning Roundup: What Amazon Owes the World
August 12, 2013 | 10:00 am

Shrewd Tips for Book Publicity (Digital Book World) Ebooks are available up to four months earlier than their print counterparts. Those digital editions can be delivered to the media for review or story research very swiftly and without the delays of printing and shipping. -- New Spotify for Books to Launch Soon in Netherlands (The Digital Reader) The Dutch publishing group WPG Uitgevers is reportedly looking into launching an ebook subscription service in that country. Details are still scarce, but this service is said to be under development in partnership with the Flemish publisher Lannoo. ...

Writers and Self-Promotion: Stop bleating, start writing
August 5, 2013 | 11:12 am

There have been a couple of very public effusions—and counterblasts—recently by and about the writers stepping onto the self-promotion treadmill as part of the new post-Kindle slog of selling your books and your self, self-published or otherwise. First of all there was first-time novelist Anakana Schofield—not self-published, by the way, but published in the UK by OneWorld, talking in The Guardian about the woes of promoting her book, "Malarky." Then there was book promotion PR professional Ruth Killick answering Anakana, and explaining "Why authors need to join the PR circus." And now we have Sean Beaudoin in Salon—but originally published in...

Self-publishing author Ted Heller doesn’t like the process. That may be because he’s doing it wrong.
May 16, 2013 | 11:23 am

Self-publishing is not for everyone. It’s not for the impatient. It’s not for those dreaming of great successes. Self-publishing is one of the hardest gigs to get into—that has been proven by hundreds (if not thousands) of authors who have self-published books. That’s not to say you cannot have great success, or even quick success, if you self-publish. It just won’t happen for most. Ted Heller recently wrote an article for Salon complaining about his own self-publishing experience. Heller had three previous books published the traditional way. When his latest book West of Babylon, didn’t get a bite, he decided to go the self-publishing...