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Posts tagged print

Why people still prefer print – in pictures
September 28, 2014 | 3:29 pm

books_infographic-674x1030Here's an interesting infographic from UK new-era second-hand book trading platform FatBrain on why people still prefer print books to ebooks - all down in pretty pictures for those who reading onscreen has left comprehensionally challenged. And of course, FatBrain, whose business depends on people emailing barcodes or ISBNs from print books, has a strong vested interest in people opting for print. But take a look at the pretty pictures that are almost as easy to follow as ink ant trails pressed into woodpulp, and enjoy.  ...

Future Library places a 100-year bet on the printed page
September 5, 2014 | 2:15 pm

An interesting - and pretty conceptual - art project from Scottish artist Katie Paterson highlights issues around the future of the printed book, and even the survival of literature. The so-called Future Library (Framtidsbiblioteket) for the city of Oslo in Norway looks to commit 100 unpublished works - one per year - to a century's wait while 1000 trees grow in a Norwegian forest, awaiting the day in 2114 when they will furnish the wood to print those works in an anthology. And the first writer to contribute to the project is Margaret Atwood. "Tending the forest and ensuring its preservation...

Another Print vs Paper Story
February 14, 2014 | 2:35 pm

print vs paperThanks to Nate at The Digital Reader for posting the link to this blog post by author John Guillen. It's a fairly straightforward rehash of my least favourite theme of the ebook revolution: the paper 'versus' pixel straw horse. From the article: "The print vs. e-book question had never once been asked prior to the 2000s. But it’s a question that every bibliophile has struggled with at some point in recent years. I know I have. Before I discuss which side of the stick I happen to fall on, let’s delve into the battle a little bit first." Okay, where to start?...

Morning Roundup: Kindle FreeTime Updated, 70% of Readers Will Not Abandon Print Books and more
December 10, 2013 | 9:00 am

kindle freetimeAmazon Updates Kindle FreeTime with New Educational and Parental Controls (Digital Book World) Parents can now use Kindle FreeTime to set educational goals for their kids, and make sure their kids have met their goals before switching to cartoons and games. *** Almost 70% of Readers Will Not Abandon Print Books: Ricoh Study (GalleyCat) Nearly 70 percent of consumers feel it is unlikely that they’ll give up on printed books by 2016, according to a new report from Ricoh and analyst firm IT Strategies with the University of Colorado at Boulder. *** How Not to Deal with Plagiarism (Techdirt) We've had a few posts about plagiarism here...

Morning Roundup: The End of Print? What Three Skills Do You Need in Publishing and more
November 27, 2013 | 9:00 am

end of printThe End of Print? Hold That Thought (Campus Books) Don’t get us wrong, we think digital books have definite advantages and we love enhanced learning solutions that take eBooks from PDFs read on the screen to collaborative experiential environments with all sorts of interaction and quizzes and links and live help. But we see this as more of a complement to print books and reading on the page rather than a replacement. And we’re not alone. *** Massachusetts Launches Statewide Digital Library Pilot (The Digital Reader) Over the next 6 months the State Library System will be testing options for a statewide ebook library....

Weekend Roundup: Print Books No Longer the Norm? Kobo Takes a Firm Stand and more
October 27, 2013 | 11:07 am

print booksFor Major Pubs, Will Print No Longer be the Norm? (Publishers Weekly) Format has been a long-simmering topic of debate in book publishing, and the question of when, and if, a title is published in hardcover, paperback, and/or digital has become even more pressing as bricks-and-mortar bookstores dwindle and e-book sales grow. *** Kobo: Writers Free to Write What They Want, We Are Not Compelled to Sell It (GoodeReader) Kobo and several other self-publishing platforms took a bold stance and blocked self-published titles from sale until a thorough review could be conducted. Angry accusations filled the social media sphere as authors discovered their titles...

Print Dead at 1,803
July 27, 2013 | 1:51 pm

print  NEW YORK—Sources close to print, the method of applying ink to paper in order to convey information to a mass audience, have confirmed that the declining medium passed away early Thursday morning. The influential means of communication was 1,803. Print, which had for nearly two millennia worked tirelessly to spread knowledge around the globe in the form of books, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, and numerous other textual materials, reportedly succumbed to its long battle with ill health, leaving behind legions of readers who had for years benefited from the dissemination of ideas made possible by the advent of printed materials. Reaction to print’s tragic...

Norwich’s Galley Beggar Press doesn’t need to beg for independent publishing
June 26, 2013 | 10:15 am

Gallery Beggar PressSmall UK independent fiction publisher Galley Beggar Press, based in the East Anglian city of Norwich, recently attracted a lot of attention when the august Times Literary Supplement ran a high-profile and hugely positive review of one of its latest books, "A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing," by Eimear McBride. In the TLS, David Collard wrote: “Writing of this quality is rare and deserves a wide readership ... McBride is a writer of remarkable power and originality.” Galley Beggar Press produces fine e-book editions of all its books, while aspiring to be "an old-fashioned publisher for the 21st century." I spoke to Sam Jordison,...

Some things will always stay print
May 24, 2013 | 12:15 pm

After long campaigns carrying the fight for e-books to the print-only diehards, I’d like to turn back for once to something that can never be put into electronic format and will forever remain print. And for very good reasons. And yet it had to wait over a century until 2004 before appearing in the form its author originally wanted. And it is available online. The work is Un coup de Dés (A Throw of the Dice) , or in full, Un coup de Dés jamais n'abolira le Hasard (A Throw of the Dice Will Never Abolish Chance), French Symbolist poet Stéphane...

Arthur Frommer reacquires his guidebook brand from Google
April 4, 2013 | 2:57 pm

FrommerAccording to an Associated Press report that was filed less than three hours ago today, the travel publishing pioneer Arthur Frommer "said Wednesday that he has reacquired rights to his travel guidebook brand from Google, and that he intends to resume publishing Frommer guidebooks." Back on the 22nd of March, we reported on the news that Google had decided to cease publishing all print editions of the Frommer's travel guidebooks, which it had acquired just seven months earlier from Wiley, the previous owner of the brand. Now, it appears as if Arthur Frommer himself—a true trailblazer in the travel guidebook industry—has somehow...

Is the Vampire Weekend classified ad proof that print is approaching its retro-cool tipping point?
February 16, 2013 | 1:56 pm

Vampire Weekend The Approval MatrixI about wet myself after opening up the February 18 issue of New York magazine, after which I immediately flipped to the often imitated (but never duplicated) Approval Matrix. There it was, right down in the furthest corner of the Brilliant/Lowbrow axis: Liberal-arts rockers Vampire Weekend show their allegiance to print by announcing their new album title in the N.Y. Times classifieds. Don't get me wrong: I realize we're all media-savvy enough to recognize this sort of thing as a clever marketing ploy, and nothing more. But therein lies the basis of my excitement ... and the overarching point of this post. Let me...

For the first time in history print is optional. Now what?
February 6, 2012 | 11:14 am

Images That's the title of an article in the [e-reads] blog: Despite the gloomy talk about the death of the book it’s pretty clear that printed books serve an essential function in our culture and will always be with us. For those who greet this statement skepticism, we reiterate that there is nothing wrong with printed books – just the way they are distributed. The big difference between the past and the present is that for the first time in history, printed books are optional. The implications of this fact are profound. Until very recently the only mode for publishers to introduce content was...