Follow us on
Connect
More on TechnologyTell: Gadget News | Apple News

Posts tagged pricing

Publishers go off deep end, pay consultant to tell them what they want to hear
April 3, 2014 | 1:24 pm

Diogenes-statue-Sinop-enhancedSo, let me get this straight. Frank Luby, a consultant speaking at Digital Book World, says that e-books are more convenient than printed books, and therefore, they should cost more. Is this some kind of a joke? Apparently not; it was posted April 2, and people elsewhere seem to be taking it seriously. This is so wrong I hardly even know where to begin. It’s true that I can see how publishers would want to hear what this guy has to say. Basically, he’s telling them only what they already believe themselves. And it’s a belief they...

Been there, read that, passed on the t-shirt: The ebook pricing false comparison
March 23, 2014 | 1:27 pm

As a follow-up to the ebook pricing discussion, here's a piece from Digital Book World that makes a completely false case for society's undervaluing of ebooks. Why false? Because you could have exactly the same debate about print books. "Why are T-shirts more valuable than Ebooks?" asks Beth Bacon, and she instances her brothers-in-law's new t-shirt sales website that "sells comfy, cool T-shirts for $25. I fully support their entrepreneurial launch. But I couldn’t help thinking about it in comparison to publishers, selling ebooks for a just couple of bucks. It struck me as odd that our society values ebooks at...

Germany shows higher price points can pay for ebooks
February 4, 2014 | 10:15 am

AmazonAuthoritative and often stimulating German epublishing website Die Self-Publisher-Bibel (The Self-Publisher Bible) has just released a breakdown, based on 2013 data of sales via Amazon's top 1000 titles, of the most profitable price points for ebook sales in Germany. And it found that, unlike the U.S., where sales tend to peak both in the $1-2 range, but also at the $10 price point, or the UK, which seems to be truly a bottom-feeding market, with most sales at 0.99p ($1.60), Germany has its best sales at EUR2.99 ($4.05) and EUR3.99 ($5.40), but with strong sales still at EUR8.99 ($12.16). Moving the...

Amazon shuffles its prices – over 2.5 million times per day
December 16, 2013 | 4:58 pm

Anyone who is a tiny bit vexed by Amazon's pricing policies might have to be ready for some fast footwork to stay abreast of the object of their ire. Because Profitero, "the leading global provider of online competitor pricing data," has just released research showing that "Amazon.com makes more than 2.5 million price changes every day," compared to an average around one fiftieth of that for competitors such as Best Buy and Walmart in the benchmark month of November. [caption id="attachment_103344" align="aligncenter" width="614"] Source: Profitero[/caption] Since Amazon seems to be flavor of the month among publicity-hungry research data providers, some of whose reports...

The Secret to eReading on the Cheap
December 12, 2013 | 12:38 pm

ereading on the cheapEvery week, I read at least one article on how cheap ebooks are these days, and it always startles me. It seems that whenever I hear about a book I want to read, I go to look it up and it's well over $10. The latest wish list book came after I started reading an unread purchase from last year, decided I liked it and went looking for other titles by the author. I found one which looked fabulous, and it was going for $12.60 in paperback or $14.32 in the Kindle---and this wasn't a hot new release either, but...

Morning Roundup: B&N Struggles Good for Indie Bookstores? Two articles on eBook Pricing
December 12, 2013 | 9:00 am

indie bookstoreCould B&N’s Struggles Strengthen Indie Bookshops? (Indie Reader) If B&N faces the same gloomy fate [as Borders], there might be a sunny side for indie bookstores, and readers who love them. *** eBook Prices Still a Sensitive Issue for Authors, Publishers (GoodeReader) As more and more holiday shoppers scramble to finish up their holiday shopping, publishers and book retailers have taken notice and are offering considerable discounts on their titles. *** Indies Are Getting Clobbered by Big Name eBook Discounts – But Not For The Reason You Think (The Digital Reader) Indie authors are beginning to notice, and one in particular blogged about it last week. That...

Voxburner UK young reader info dripfeed claims ebooks too pricey, novels most popular
December 11, 2013 | 10:15 am

UK market research organization Voxburner, which claims to be "giving you the edge on young consumers," continues to dribble out information snippets from its recent Buying Digital Content report, based on a survey of 1,420 respondents between the ages of 16 and 24, taken between September 25th and 18 October 18th, 2013. The latest bulletin reports that "the majority of those who bought ebooks preferred fiction novels over academic and non-fiction titles." "Young people are enjoying the affordability of ebooks, and have gravitated towards fictional novels as they tend to be a lot cheaper than non-fiction," notes Voxburner. And it quotes...

Apple Facing Retina Display Shortage, Might Have To Delay iPad Mini 2 Launch
July 15, 2013 | 2:56 pm

iPad Mini 2Since Apple’s first mid-sized, mid-range tablet has proven to be such a booming success, no one really doubted an iPad Mini 2 coming sooner or later. But the exact ETA of this new slate has always been the big question mark. (Well, that ... and the specs and the pricing, of course.) Unfortunately for us (and fortunately for the tech giant), Cupertino has managed to keep a very tight lid on iPad Mini 2-related rumors, so here we are, eight months after the first-gen’s release, with nothing of substance known about the follow-up. And by “known,” I mean intel revealed by...

Steps We Must Consider When Pricing E-Books? Really?
April 16, 2013 | 1:15 pm

E-BooksWhen I read the DBW article yesterday entitled "7 Must-Consider Strategies for Ebook Pricing," I ended up scratching my head. What happened to "listen to the consumer and what they consistently tell you they want?" That sounds like a good idea when considering pricing e-books. Apparently not. It started with strategy #1. "Charge extra for convenience." Here's the quote: Though ebooks cost less to print, ship, and stock than paper books, they’re much more convenient for readers. So why not charge extra for that convenience? With this strategy, the price of an ebook would be higher than its equivalent in paper—isn’t immediate...

RoyaltyShare founder Bob Kohn appeals denial of his right to appeal DoJ agency pricing settlement
October 12, 2012 | 9:52 pm

Bob KohnI’m a little late, but I wanted to bring up just one story that popped up between the times I was at The Digital Reader and here. I’ve been following the saga of RoyaltyShare founder Bob Kohn at length with some interest and more than a little amusement. (That's Kohn in the photo to the right.)  Though he doesn’t necessary have a direct stake in the case’s outcome, Kohn has nonetheless been filing verbose comments, legal motions, and even a comic book (as a legal motion) in an attempt to head off the Department of Justice’s proposed agency pricing settlement....

Writing on trains and what it means for e-books
July 6, 2012 | 8:15 am

RPY_JULIA_CROUCH_AM07_0On Felicity Wood’s blog, Julia Crouch writes a guest post about her experiences writing on trains, using it in part as a metaphor for the e-book experience, and partly to discuss a publicity project she did in which she wrote a complete short story over the course of her train journey to and from a writers’ convention. The story, Strangeness On A Train, has been published as a free eBook on Amazon and Apple, as well as being printed up into samplers to be handed out on the Harrogate train and at the Harrogate Crime Writing...

If publishers cannot control e-book retail prices, how should they set their own?
May 18, 2012 | 12:45 am

On the Columbia Journalism Review, Ryan Chittum has a rebuttal to a number of recent posts about e-book production costs and price, including the post by Mathew Ingram that I covered here. Though the article is replete with quotes and counter-arguments, but the central thrust seems to be that publishers ought to be able to charge what they want to—but they really should be wanting to charge less. At base, copyright holders have the right to ask what they want to get for their work (which is why they were so concerned about Amazon selling ebooks...