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Posts tagged netflix

Netflix Finally Adding Profiles
August 1, 2013 | 12:54 pm

AmazonOh happy day! We've been cord cutters relying on Netflix for years, and yes, our son in college is one of those "digital moochers" that Joanna wrote about earlier this year. Unfortunately, my son, husband and I all have different tastes in movies, and Netflix offers me up some interesting suggestions. (No, I don't want to watch Chinese martial arts movies. Or depressing art flicks.) At least there aren't any youngsters in the house, so I don't have to deal with animated pony recommendations. Netflix has been talking about adding profiles for most of a year now, and it looks like they...

Tablets and mobile just took a generational leap forward
July 25, 2013 | 2:07 pm

tabletsWith the blogs and newswires buzzing over Google's update of its hugely popular Nexus 7 tablet, as well as Google's release of the new ChromeCast HDMI dongle, it's not hard to conclude that quite a lot is happening in the world of Android. The Nexus 7 tablet, after all, was arguably the device that really put Android tablets on the map over the iPad. And the new ChromeCast dongle, for those of you who may not be familiar with it, essentially turns any mobile device (Android or iOS), or any Chrome browser-equipped PC or laptop, into a video-streaming hub able to feed media...

The ‘Future’ of Entertainment Looks a Lot Like 1995
July 21, 2013 | 8:44 pm

iTunesThis weekend, we hit a milestone in my household: the Beloved finally got sick enough of the limited selection on flat-rate Netflix to venture into the pay-per-movie world of the iTunes Store, which we can access on the bedroom television via the spiffy little Apple TV box. And ... color us disappointed. We made our selection, pressed the play button and got the following screen: 'Ready to Play in 2 hours, 7 minutes.' Um ... really? What followed was almost more entertaining than the movie turned out to be: As the Beloved kept trying to reload the screen to increasingly random predictions (ready to...

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: ‘Cord Cutters’ Survey Makes Wrong Point
July 12, 2013 | 9:38 am

surveyGigaOM has a report about a comScore survey showing that 16 percent of Canadians "stream all of their TV from on-line sources." The survey also has an additional 35 percent of Canadians watching both traditional television and a further 35 percent only watching traditional television. Janko Roetggers correctly points out some food-for-thought in the results here: that Google, owner of YouTube, commissioned the survey, and that bandwith caps, which are prevalent in Canada, might be playing a factor in what Canadians watch on-line. But it also misses the point that if you don't ask the right questions, you won't get a full picture...

Does Amazon Have an Acquisition Hit List?
July 10, 2013 | 12:31 pm

AmazonThere's been a lot of speculation lately around Amazon's long-term strategic intentions and its overall modus operandi. David Streitfeld's New York Times blog opined that, "it has made the future of bookselling seem as if it will inevitably be owned by Amazon." Others have been very quick to pick up on the organizational and technological pincer movement that enables this market dominance, with "green marketing and business ethics success expert" Shel Horowitz, for instance, remarking that: "This is what happens when a company gains a market share bordering on monopoly—while establishing a tech and logistics infrastructure that would be very difficult for a new...

Netflix and e-books: E-media symmetries
July 9, 2013 | 9:30 pm

At first glance, this story about how Netflix is changing the nature of how Hollywood thinks about TV doesn’t seem to have a lot to do with e-books. But if you take a second look, you might notice how the service’s “celestial jukebox” nature lines up with the instant gratification and format freedom of e-books. There’s some interesting symmetry there. E-books made it possible to sell shorter-form works like novellas, short stories, or feature-length articles on their own as “Kindle Singles” or equivalent formats. They also allow consumers to “binge” on series if they’re all available, getting around the...

Movie Review: Disrespect for the classics in Arnon Goldfinger’s ‘The Flat’ (2011)
July 2, 2013 | 11:01 am

The Flat "The Flat" is a charming 2011 documentary I recently watched on Netflix. The film, by writer-director Arnon Goldfinger, centers around the flat (i.e., the apartment) of his late grandmother, which over the course of the film, the family empties following her death. During this process, they uncover a pile of old magazines that highlight an element of his grandparents' past that they were not expecting—it concerns their exit from Nazi Germany prior to the Holocaust. [caption id="attachment_88851" align="alignright" width="125"] Arnon Goldfinger[/caption] I won't spoil the surprise, because it's nicely done. But what made me want to share this film here on TeleRead...

Even in the digital age, the quality and availability of content are still king
May 29, 2013 | 3:20 pm

availability and qualityIn all the fuss over digital vs. paper, cord cutters vs. subscribers, this format vs. that one, two stories crossed my inbox today that showed me, yet again, even in this digital age, the two most important things—quality and availability—remain the same. It doesn't matter what you're selling, in what format, via what technology or medium—quality and availability always come first. Exhibit A: Netflix Turfs Viacom Laura Hazard Owen is one of many who reported about Netflix declining to renew their contract with Viacom. The fallout? Millions of unhappy parents whose children enjoyed streaming episodes of Dora the Explorer and SpongeBob SquarePants. Amidst...

Netflix CEO: Password Sharing is Not a Big Deal
April 23, 2013 | 10:00 am

NetflixNetflix CEO Reed Hastings is on the record with a comment over at GigaOM that password sharing among family members is not a big deal. I applaud him for his sensibility in recognizing this. I think too many content creators fail to make a distinction between casual sharing amongst members of a household, and uploading to a torrent for millions and millions of people to consume for free. I am delighted to see a big player like Hastings recognize this. He does concede that multiple users sharing an account is 'not ideal.' But he clarifies that what they are seeing is situations such...

The Decline and Fall of the American Newsroom
April 22, 2013 | 12:15 pm

* Editor's Note: The end of this post contains a minor House of Cards spoiler. Photographer Will Steacy has a photo essay on his online portfolio called 'Deadline;' I've seen it pop up on several blogs this past week. In the essay, Steacy memorializes the newsroom of the Philadelphia Inquirer, from their first buyout in 2009 through their move from the iconic 'Tower of Truth' office tower and into a single-floor office at the top of an old department store. Some of the photos, such as the before-and-after of the old newsroom—full of desks and phones and people, and then an empty shell—are...

Books and Hypocrisy in America: One father’s unique perspective
April 15, 2013 | 10:15 am

books   The image above (also linked to here) has been making the social media rounds lately. Not much to say about it other than "I agree." It reminds me of a documentary the Beloved and I have been watching on Netflix this week about a man who left the Neo-Nazi community and is trying to start his life over again. One of the things that disillusioned him about that community was the hypocrisy—the leaders would preach that they were doing whatever they did "for the children," but the rate of domestic violence in that community was staggeringly high. What this picture is...

Cord Cutters, Digital Mooches and the Content Conundrum of the Future
March 29, 2013 | 2:15 pm

Cord Cutters Dan linked to a great article in today's Morning Links roundup about 'digital mooches,' aka the 20-somethings who may be leaving Mom and Dad's house in the coming years, yet seem to have no plans to leave their parents' cell phone contracts or Netflix subscriptions. I read this article with interest; I'd just read another about 'cord cutters,' aka the cable-free, and how the content industry is wringing their hands about what to do with these people. It seems these articles, read together, paint an ominous pattern: The kids aren't paying because they get it for 'free' at home. Then they turn...