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Posts tagged netflix

Amazon data mining to find customer tastes
November 3, 2013 | 10:54 pm

The Wall Street Journal has an interesting piece on Amazon’s original television programming pilot selection process, in which it winnowed down a long list of pilots using user ratings and feedback to pick the ones that were most likely to succeed to base series on. The WSJ compares this approach to that taken by Netflix, who didn’t even require a pilot for shows like Orange is the New Black or House of Cards. While this doesn’t have a whole lot to do with books, it does bring up one of the most crucial aspects of Amazon as a process. I found...

Is the ‘Download’ Model For Technology Going to Become Obsolete?
October 19, 2013 | 12:19 pm

technologyThe Beloved and I have had many an amusing conversation about how we would explain the technology of our youths to the children in our lives. I think they will find the computer mouse hilariously quaint, and the notion that if you wanted to phone somebody and they were not home, that was it will I am sure shock and horrify them. Lately, I have been wondering if the notion of purchasing media and having a copy to 'own' might be going the way of the dodo bird too. We each have our little hobbies; when the Beloved is messing with...

The Debate Over Paying for News
September 30, 2013 | 3:11 pm

Matthew Ingram has a great write-up on the question of paying for news. Will people do it? Do paywalls actually generate revenue for traditional newspapers? The sobering answer is, not really---unless you are the New York Times. From the article: "Take Gannett, for example. The newspaper chain is the largest newspaper publisher in the U.S. as measured by circulation, with more than 81 daily papers, and it has been betting heavily on paywalls to drive additional revenue at its various properties. So after two years or so of trying to push its paywall strategy, how many of Gannett’s newspaper readers have been convinced...

Cord cutting snips the reality-TV noose
August 10, 2013 | 9:00 am

reality-tvFrom Techdirt comes yet another bulletin about the phenomenon of cord cutters—this rising demographic is, well, continuing to rise. From the article: The pool of potential customers has risen with no correlative rise in subscribers. That's an indication that more households are foregoing cable television entirely...that had better represent a huge concern for the industry. Television providers have done a horrible job of making their content available in the way customers want it, when the customers want it, and they result has been a declining subscriber base. Personally, I humbly submit that the availability...

Netflix Finally Adding Profiles
August 1, 2013 | 12:54 pm

AmazonOh happy day! We've been cord cutters relying on Netflix for years, and yes, our son in college is one of those "digital moochers" that Joanna wrote about earlier this year. Unfortunately, my son, husband and I all have different tastes in movies, and Netflix offers me up some interesting suggestions. (No, I don't want to watch Chinese martial arts movies. Or depressing art flicks.) At least there aren't any youngsters in the house, so I don't have to deal with animated pony recommendations. Netflix has been talking about adding profiles for most of a year now, and it looks like they...

Tablets and mobile just took a generational leap forward
July 25, 2013 | 2:07 pm

tabletsWith the blogs and newswires buzzing over Google's update of its hugely popular Nexus 7 tablet, as well as Google's release of the new ChromeCast HDMI dongle, it's not hard to conclude that quite a lot is happening in the world of Android. The Nexus 7 tablet, after all, was arguably the device that really put Android tablets on the map over the iPad. And the new ChromeCast dongle, for those of you who may not be familiar with it, essentially turns any mobile device (Android or iOS), or any Chrome browser-equipped PC or laptop, into a video-streaming hub able to feed media...

The ‘Future’ of Entertainment Looks a Lot Like 1995
July 21, 2013 | 8:44 pm

iTunesThis weekend, we hit a milestone in my household: the Beloved finally got sick enough of the limited selection on flat-rate Netflix to venture into the pay-per-movie world of the iTunes Store, which we can access on the bedroom television via the spiffy little Apple TV box. And ... color us disappointed. We made our selection, pressed the play button and got the following screen: 'Ready to Play in 2 hours, 7 minutes.' Um ... really? What followed was almost more entertaining than the movie turned out to be: As the Beloved kept trying to reload the screen to increasingly random predictions (ready to...

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: ‘Cord Cutters’ Survey Makes Wrong Point
July 12, 2013 | 9:38 am

surveyGigaOM has a report about a comScore survey showing that 16 percent of Canadians "stream all of their TV from on-line sources." The survey also has an additional 35 percent of Canadians watching both traditional television and a further 35 percent only watching traditional television. Janko Roetggers correctly points out some food-for-thought in the results here: that Google, owner of YouTube, commissioned the survey, and that bandwith caps, which are prevalent in Canada, might be playing a factor in what Canadians watch on-line. But it also misses the point that if you don't ask the right questions, you won't get a full picture...

Does Amazon Have an Acquisition Hit List?
July 10, 2013 | 12:31 pm

AmazonThere's been a lot of speculation lately around Amazon's long-term strategic intentions and its overall modus operandi. David Streitfeld's New York Times blog opined that, "it has made the future of bookselling seem as if it will inevitably be owned by Amazon." Others have been very quick to pick up on the organizational and technological pincer movement that enables this market dominance, with "green marketing and business ethics success expert" Shel Horowitz, for instance, remarking that: "This is what happens when a company gains a market share bordering on monopoly—while establishing a tech and logistics infrastructure that would be very difficult for a new...

Netflix and e-books: E-media symmetries
July 9, 2013 | 9:30 pm

At first glance, this story about how Netflix is changing the nature of how Hollywood thinks about TV doesn’t seem to have a lot to do with e-books. But if you take a second look, you might notice how the service’s “celestial jukebox” nature lines up with the instant gratification and format freedom of e-books. There’s some interesting symmetry there. E-books made it possible to sell shorter-form works like novellas, short stories, or feature-length articles on their own as “Kindle Singles” or equivalent formats. They also allow consumers to “binge” on series if they’re all available, getting around the...

Movie Review: Disrespect for the classics in Arnon Goldfinger’s ‘The Flat’ (2011)
July 2, 2013 | 11:01 am

The Flat "The Flat" is a charming 2011 documentary I recently watched on Netflix. The film, by writer-director Arnon Goldfinger, centers around the flat (i.e., the apartment) of his late grandmother, which over the course of the film, the family empties following her death. During this process, they uncover a pile of old magazines that highlight an element of his grandparents' past that they were not expecting—it concerns their exit from Nazi Germany prior to the Holocaust. [caption id="attachment_88851" align="alignright" width="125"] Arnon Goldfinger[/caption] I won't spoil the surprise, because it's nicely done. But what made me want to share this film here on TeleRead...

Even in the digital age, the quality and availability of content are still king
May 29, 2013 | 3:20 pm

availability and qualityIn all the fuss over digital vs. paper, cord cutters vs. subscribers, this format vs. that one, two stories crossed my inbox today that showed me, yet again, even in this digital age, the two most important things—quality and availability—remain the same. It doesn't matter what you're selling, in what format, via what technology or medium—quality and availability always come first. Exhibit A: Netflix Turfs Viacom Laura Hazard Owen is one of many who reported about Netflix declining to renew their contract with Viacom. The fallout? Millions of unhappy parents whose children enjoyed streaming episodes of Dora the Explorer and SpongeBob SquarePants. Amidst...