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Posts tagged netflix

Morning Links: Netflix closes call center. Self-publishing the YouTube of literature?
October 24, 2014 | 9:00 am

netflixResponding to DVD Subscription Decline, Netflix Closes Call Centre (GigaOM) Remember those red envelopes? Fewer and fewer people use Netflix to get DVDs, which is why the company is now closing a call center in Oregon. *** Kobo Releases Massive Update to Current Generation of eReaders (GoodeReader) It includes a bevy of enhancements, such as the ability to turn off the X-Ray inspired Beyond the Book. *** More Advice to Authors United (JA Konrath) I know it has only been three days, but why hasn't Authors United announced its next move? I'm just one man, and I can compose and post a blog response within a few...

Morning Roundup: Netflix paying Time Warner Cable. Kensington partnering with BAM
August 20, 2014 | 9:00 am

netflixReading Helped Me Overcome a Racist Upbringing (Book Riot) Through books, though, I met a lot of people that I never would have met in person; more importantly, I saw struggles that I never would have experienced in my own body. *** Netflix is Now Paying Time Warner Cable for Direst Access and Faster Streams (GigaOM) Netflix, the online streaming giant, has signed a paid peering deal with Time Warner Cable, meaning that it now has deals with the four biggest U.S. ISPs. *** Kensington Signs Exclusive to Sell Ebook Imprint Titles in Print at Books-A-Million (Digital Book World) Kensington Publishing Corp. has announced an exclusive partnership...

Morning Roundup: The latest Humble Ebook Bundle and more
June 5, 2014 | 10:39 am

I was so excited to hear that Pulitzer finalist Karen Russell (author of novel Swamplandia! and short story collections St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves and Vampires in the Lemon Grove) had a new work coming out this spring. Then I heard it was a NOVELLA and I seriously heard train wheels screech to a stop in real life. ...

Two cheers for Chromecast?
April 14, 2014 | 10:32 am

As TeleRead readers will be well aware, Chromecast, Google's neat HDMI-compatible AV streaming dongle and its associated programs,  has been around for a while now; but it's only just made it to certain European markets, and courtesy of my parents, I may still be Hungary's pioneering Chromecast owner. And though I love the technology, my first impressions are mixed - in a way that might be down to the usual Big Media interference in simple user-friendly propositions. Yes, it's straightforward no-brain plug-and-play. Yes, it streams content to your TV screen or HDMI-compatible monitor over your WiFi network - (mostly) pretty seamlessly....

That’s show biz: The value propositions of bookstores and movies
April 12, 2014 | 5:35 am

Sometimes when I’m trawling through the news, I run across unrelated posts that form an interesting juxtaposition. Here’s one concerning the very similar way that technological change has affected two entirely different industries. First, Dan Meadows (not a close relation as far as I know) has an interesting pair of posts relating to bookstores, publishers, and their respective value propositions. In the first one, he talks about bookstores and publishers in general. The services these institutions offer hasn’t changed—bookstores still have about the same number of books, publishers still offer the same services—but because people suddenly have even better...

The Flip Side of the ‘Permission Culture’ Argument
April 10, 2014 | 12:28 pm

Permission CultureTechdirt has put up a great piece about what they are calling the 'permission culture' problem. They are referring to the difficulties of a business model such as Netflix, which has moved from distributing physical goods to distributing streaming digital ones: "The problem is that, unlike earlier movie-rental options, streaming rights fall fundamentally within a permission culture. Netflix is a great illustration of what's gone wrong here. It's gone from having a nearly unrivaled catalog of films available to rent to being the butt of Onion jokes. What happened: It shifted from a system where nobody had a veto power over...

Specialty programming: good news for TV, bad news for books
March 10, 2014 | 4:43 pm

specialty programmingMy friend David Rothman posted this NY Times article on Facebook this morning, with the comment 'good news for TV, bad news for books.' The article talks about this golden age of cord-cutting, specialty programming (like on Netflix) and high-end cable series, with the following aside: "I was never one of those snobby people who would claim to not own a television when the subject came up, but I was generally more a reader than a watcher. That was before the explosion in quality television tipped me over into a viewing frenzy." This was an interesting reminder for me that, amidst...

FAA failure to keep up with commercial drone use could prevent innovation
February 25, 2014 | 5:59 pm

drone delivery At the risk of droning on, it seems like there has been a lot of news involving drones lately. We covered Amazon’s announcement of package delivery (someday) via drones, and some responses to it. Clearly, drone services could fill the middle range between snail-mail delivery and electronic downloading: a physical good that reaches you quickly. And that is not even considering the other potential uses, such as aerial photography. But that is in the nebulous future. What about now? Well, the problem with drone use right now is that commercial drone use is technically illegal—the...

Marvel, Netflix titles vanished because of impermanence of contracts, not digital media
January 2, 2014 | 3:00 pm

deadpoolBecause I’m sure sooner or later someone’s going to bring this up as an example of the impermanence of digital media, and how you should never buy anything from a digital store because they can always take it away from you, I figured I’d better cover it first. The big news that broke in the video game scene yesterday is that Marvel, a subsidiary of Disney, has just pulled a number of popular computer games based on its properties out of all digital distribution outlets: Steam, Xbox Live, and PlayStation Network. The games include Deadpool, several Spider-Man titles, and several...

Review: Google Chromecast
December 5, 2013 | 6:11 pm

CAM00395-1I’ve had my Google Chromecast for a couple of days now. I’ve unboxed it for YouTube, and I’ve written up a lengthy review for Answers.com. To summarize, by and large, it’s a great little device. In some ways not as useful as the Roku yet (in particular, no Amazon Prime or local media streaming), in other ways it blows the little black box right out of the water. One of the Chromecast’s biggest advantages is when it comes to searching media. With the Roku, and many other devices like it, you have to plink your title into the search...

Blockbuster closes its last stores – is this the future for Barnes & Noble?
November 6, 2013 | 6:46 pm

Big news all over the net today: Blockbuster Video (now a sub-brand of Dish Network) is closing its last 300 corporate-owned stores, and shutting down its DVD-rental-by-mail program. 50 franchised stores will remain open for the time being, but the writing is probably on the wall for them too. Blockbuster’s @Home and On Demand services for streaming or downloaded video will also continue. While this might not seem relevant to e-books directly, it’s worth bearing in mind that the business pressures that brought this turn of events about are basically the same pressures that did in Borders and are facing Barnes...

Amazon data mining to find customer tastes
November 3, 2013 | 10:54 pm

The Wall Street Journal has an interesting piece on Amazon’s original television programming pilot selection process, in which it winnowed down a long list of pilots using user ratings and feedback to pick the ones that were most likely to succeed to base series on. The WSJ compares this approach to that taken by Netflix, who didn’t even require a pilot for shows like Orange is the New Black or House of Cards. While this doesn’t have a whole lot to do with books, it does bring up one of the most crucial aspects of Amazon as a process. I found...