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Posts tagged Macmillan

Humble Bundle plans to expand e-book, audiobook offerings
March 3, 2014 | 8:25 pm

humblelogoRemember the Humble E-Book Bundles? Humble’s done a couple of them (not counting the ones by other bundle sites) plus an audiobook bundle, and wants to do more. Calvin Reid has a great article at Publishers Weekly looking at the Humble Bundle e-book program in depth. It has some interesting facts. It turns out that the first two pay-what-you-want Humble E-Book Bundles were actually organized by Cory Doctorow. Not a big surprise given their DRM-free nature. The problem was that DRM-free nature meant Macmillan (whose Tor subsidiary had already gone DRM-free) was the only Big Five publisher willing to...

The SFWA might just stay relevant after all
February 20, 2014 | 11:12 pm

apologycatHere’s an epilogue to the SFWA kerfuffle I posted about a couple of days ago: the central figure in the article, Sean Fodera, has posted a public apology to Mary Robinette Kowal for his unprofessional remarks (which she has accepted), and also a clarification on his attitude about women in SF. (The apology was apparently so popular that it caused SFF.net to go down for a while. It seems to be back up now, but just in case, screencaps are available at Radish Reviews.) In the apology, Fodera explains that his antipathy toward Kowal was not because she was a woman,...

Is the SFWA losing its relevance?
February 18, 2014 | 3:25 pm

“This is the song that doesn’t end…it just goes on and on my friend…” To mix musical metaphors, I’m getting that whole “second verse, same as the first” feeling as I look at the latest vitriol to come out of the whole Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) sexism affair (which we’ve covered in more detail here, here, and here). A few days ago, an article appeared on The Daily Dot blog citing posts from the public discussion forums on SFF.net pertaining to the latest round of ugliness. SFF.net is the discussion forum website of the SFWA, but has always...

Palgrave Macmillan contributes to science publishing peer review debate
January 29, 2014 | 2:51 pm

The question of peer review is one of the central topics of the current controversy over scientific publishing, with Wiley already trialing a "transferable peer review" procedure to speed and refine the process. Now, Palgrave Macmillan is rolling out its own "open peer review trial" as its contribution to the reform of this particular niche. "We’re experimenting to see how open forms of review can contribute to the development of scholarly monographs and Palgrave Pivot titles," Palgrave Macmillan explains. "We’ve placed selected book proposals and associated sample chapters on this publicly-accessible website and are inviting comment from anyone who feels they...

Macmillan Speaks…once
January 21, 2014 | 6:16 pm

I was clicking around links from my post about Steven Zacharius earlier today when I happened onto something amusing. Or, at least, amusing to me. Back in April of 2012, when John Sargent made his defiant post declaring Macmillan would not settle with the Department of Justice, he posted it via the Tor.com blog, with a link to a website called “Macmillan Speaks” for people who wanted to leave comments. The funny thing is, when I go to Macmillan Speaks now, all I see is that one, single solidary post from 21 months ago. Even his post surrendering to...

Bob Kohn files appeal of publisher anti-trust settlements
December 23, 2013 | 6:10 pm

Ah, the schadenfreude continues. Andrew Albanese at Publishers Weekly reports that Bob Kohn has filed his appeal of the approval of the Macmillan and Penguin e-book settlements. In the hearing a couple of weeks ago, Judge Cote suggested it was unlikely he would be found to have standing to appeal the case, since he’s not a direct party to the case. However, Kohn is clearly going to keep filing appeals until the appeals courts turn him down. Kohn’s stance is that the price-fixing conspiracy entered into by the publishers and Apple was not actually illegal, since it served to...

More developments in the scientific publishing controversy
December 12, 2013 | 4:20 pm

scientific publishing Following the current controversy over open access research and scientific publishing, a couple more items have surfaced to lend color to the debate. For one, scientific publisher Wiley is trialing a system of "transferable peer review" to speed and systematize the assessment of new research before publication. "On average, peer review takes 80 days. That’s 1,920 hours of waiting for a decision," states the Wiley announcement.  "And it all starts over if a paper gets rejected. We think that’s a long time. We know you do too. So, why not review a paper just once? If a paper is rejected, the review travels...

Macmillan offers complete backlist to ebook lending libraries
October 18, 2013 | 2:13 pm

ebook lending librariesMacmillan is putting its backlist in ebook lending libraries. The big publishing house confirmed to Publishers Weekly that more than 11,000 titles will be available through OverDrive, 3M and Baker & Taylor. Frontlist titles are not currently available. Alison Lazarus, president of Macmillan’s sales division, told PW, it was done as part of the publisher’s “ongoing evaluation of e-lending.” Macmillan had made a small group of titles available for e-lending less than a year ago with Minotaur Books imprint, a pilot program for lending e-books. According to PW, there are no reported changes to Macmillan’s model. E-book titles have two years or are borrowed 52 times...

Average price of best-selling e-books on the decline
April 9, 2013 | 11:45 am

e-booksE-books seem to be costing consumers less money. Digital Book World tracks the prices of e-books on the best-sellers lists every week. Last week, the news site found e-books on the lists averaged more than $8 a book. After a week where a new publisher (Macmillan) allowed discounted prices, the average price of e-books on the best-sellers list dropped to $7.21, a record low, according to DBW. One of the more interesting notes from DBW’s research is that $9.99 doesn’t seem to be a popular price anymore. This price point has been reserved for newer popular books and those that retailers can definitely...

One publisher, Tor/Forge, truly understands reader engagement
April 7, 2013 | 12:42 pm

It's easy to always talk about publishers who get it wrong, and yes, lots of them do. Bookish, anyone? (Where you can get recommendations, but it's all a one way street, and many, if not most, of their articles are aimed at books or authors published by the houses behind the site.) Tor, an imprint of Macmillan, gets it right. About once a week, they send out a newsletter packed full of information about movies, TV shows and books. Because they are a sci-fi/fantasy imprint, most of the news is about those genres, but that's OK. Most of their readers are likely...

Retailers begin discounting Macmillan e-books
April 5, 2013 | 10:04 am

Retailers are finally discounting Macmillan-published e-books - nearly two months after it settled its Department of Justice’s price fixing case. Prices of e-books have been lowered on sites such as Amazon and Barnes & Noble, according to Publishers Lunch. This includes books such as Silver Linings Playbook, Killing Lincoln and Ender’s Game. That leaves Penguin as the lone publisher that settled with the DOJ as to not have books discounted. Amazon is still hanging on to “This price was set by the publisher” tag on the site for Penguin books. The Macmillan discounts have ranged from about $1 to $2 off the original price. Silver...

BREAKING: Macmillan Settles with DOJ on Price Fixing
February 8, 2013 | 12:30 pm

Apple is now the lone hold-out. As you may recall, three publishers—Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster—immediately settled, leaving Penguin, MacMillan and Apple to fight it out in court. Penguin settled in December, probably to protect their pending merger with Random House. And now Macmillan joins its fellows. Macmillan CEO John Sargent cited financial reasons for the settlement, according to this story on Publishers Lunch: "Our company is not large enough to risk a worst case judgment. In this action the government accused five publishers and Apple of conspiring to raise prices. As each publisher settled, the remaining defendants became responsible not only...