Follow us on
Connect

Posts tagged Macmillan

The Holtzbrinck/Springer merger: What does it mean for scientific publishing?
January 16, 2015 | 2:25 pm

cover_natureAs per a Reuters report yesterday, the publisher of Nature and Scientific American, Germany's Holtzbrinck Publishing Group, is merging with Springer Science+Business Media, "creating a group with 1.5 billion euros ($1.75 billion) in annual sales." As well as showcasing the value locked up in scientific publishing, this merger also raises questions about the development of the field and the prospects for wider adoption of scholarly open access. Also included in the deal is educational and and social sciences publisher Palgrave Macmillan. The official Springer announcement read: Holtzbrinck Publishing Group (Holtzbrinck) and BC Partners (BCP) announced today that they have reached an agreement to merge Springer...

Scribd signs new Big 5 publisher: Macmillan
January 13, 2015 | 9:15 am

scribdEveryone has said that for subscription services to succeed, they have to have more books everyone has heard of. The subtext of that statement is that they need to have more books by traditional publishing. Scribd has done a pretty good job until now, signing deals with HarperCollins, Wiley, Kensington, Simon & Schuster, Open Road Media and Harlequin. (Did I miss anyone?) Today they add a third "Big 5" publisher, Macmillan. We knew it was coming based on John Sargent's open letter from last month announcing their deal with Amazon. In that letter, Sargent said: In our search for new routes to market, we...

Macmillan CEO pens interesting letter on publishing state of play
December 20, 2014 | 12:25 pm

john-sargent.jpgJohn Sargent is CEO of Macmillan, itself one of the Big Five publishers, although perhaps lower key and less controversial than the other four. And he penned an end-of-year message to the company's "Authors, Illustrators, and Agents" which has appeared in full on the blog of Macmillan imprint Tor. It makes for some interesting reading. Sargent's choice of date is significant. "Today a portion of our agreement with the Department of Justice (called a consent decree) expires, and we will no longer be required to allow retailers to discount e-books." In principle, at least. Although, as Sargent explains, the verdict in...

Kristine Kathryn Rusch, John Sargent: Major publishers learning, trying new things with e-books
December 18, 2014 | 6:30 pm

Here are an interesting juxtaposition of posts that just came to light today. In the first, Kristine Kathryn Rusch at last returns to blogging about the publishing industry with an end-of-year post that is both interesting and scary. Last year, I wrote an open letter asking the Big Five publishers if they’d learned anything from the Apple verdict. In her new blog post, Rusch suggests that they have, and it might not be good news for the authors who sign with them. Touching once more on the sales problems inherent in publishers no longer being able to schedule book...

Macmillan makes Nature access free in content-sharing push
December 3, 2014 | 6:29 pm

cover_natureThe scholarly open access model of scientific publishing received a boost this week when Macmillan Science and Education, "one of the leading publishing and technology companies in the world," announced a new content-sharing and free access initiative for top journal Nature and other publications offered over the Nature.com platform. According to the Macmillan release, "subscribers to 49 journals on nature.com can now legitimately and conveniently share the full-text of articles of interest with colleagues who do not have a subscription via a shareable web link on nature.com. In addition, Macmillan Science and Education will take a lead on opening up...

American Library Association welcomes Macmillan frontlist availability
July 31, 2014 | 4:19 pm

AmericanLibraryAssociationFollowing the news Macmillan Publishers is making its entire digital frontlist available through the company's library e-lending pilot program, the American Library Association (ALA) has put out a statement welcoming the news. ALA President Courtney Young had this to say: The Macmillan expansion of its library ebook program represents another important development for improving the ability of libraries to serve America’s communities. One of the most fundamental relationships and roles of libraries is to connect authors and readers. Library lending encourages experimentation, enabling people to sample new authors, topics, and genres, and stimulates the market for books. Thus libraries are a critical de...

Morning Roundup: Preston speaks again. Macmillan makes front-list available to libraries
July 30, 2014 | 9:00 am

MacmillanAnything with an RFID Chip in it Will Have to Carry this Logo in Europe (GigaOM) The logo is designed to make it clear to consumers when the goods they’re carrying contain an RFID smart chip, and to bring retailers and healthcare and banking companies out of a legal “gray zone” when it comes to data protection. *** 7 'Bookish' Things You Missed at San Diego Comic Con (Book Riot) If, like me, you had to live the San Diego Comic-Con experience vicariously through Twitter and YouTube, here’s a quick run-down of the bookish stuff you missed. *** Douglas Preston: on Amazon, Hachette and Indie Authors...

Macmillan exec asks what publishers can do for readers, but does she mean it?
June 18, 2014 | 4:46 am

Porter Anderson at FutureBook reports on a presentation given by Sara Lloyd, Pan Macmillan’s digital and communications director, at the “FutureBook Hack” conference. (TeleRead previously carried an open letter to Ms. Lloyd from Brian Ford of Lendle.) Lloyd was gung-ho about wanting publishing to move forward with digital and take things to the next level. She said things like “I think we haven’t done the great things yet and that’s what you guys are here for,” and “Ask what you can do for readers, not what you can do to solve the problems of publishers.” ...

Department of Justice files brief in Apple antitrust appeal, argues for upholding Judge Cote’s verdict
May 29, 2014 | 4:37 am

Publishers Weekly’s Andrew Albanese has a rundown of the latest developments in the Apple anti-trust affair. The Department of Justice has filed its brief in favor of the appeals court upholding Judge Cote’s guilty verdict. (GigaOm has some additional commentary and a Scribd link to the filing itself.) The filing says about what you would expect it to say: the DoJ summarized Cote’s findings and rebutted all of Apple’s attorneys’ arguments. In their brief, the DoJ basically recapped their case, and argued that the prosecution did not need to meet a higher legal standard, as Apple...

Morning Roundup: Macmillan partners with Swagbucks. Recommending books is hard and more
May 20, 2014 | 9:00 am

swagbucksMacmillan Partners With Swagbucks to Offer Readers Rewards for Sharing Book Marketing, Buying Books (Digital Book World) St. Martin’s Press has partnered with Swagbucks, the web’s most rewarding content discovery community, for a new digital literature channel called READ. *** Recommending Books is Hard (Book Riot) If you tell me, “Hey I really enjoyed The Help. What other books would I like?” I can probably spout off five books immediately that you should read. But knowing absolutely nothing about the books you’ve enjoyed makes it hard. There are just too many awesome possibilities out there. *** UK Rules eBooks Aren’t Books as Far as Taxation Is...

Humble Bundle plans to expand e-book, audiobook offerings
March 3, 2014 | 8:25 pm

humblelogoRemember the Humble E-Book Bundles? Humble’s done a couple of them (not counting the ones by other bundle sites) plus an audiobook bundle, and wants to do more. Calvin Reid has a great article at Publishers Weekly looking at the Humble Bundle e-book program in depth. It has some interesting facts. It turns out that the first two pay-what-you-want Humble E-Book Bundles were actually organized by Cory Doctorow. Not a big surprise given their DRM-free nature. The problem was that DRM-free nature meant Macmillan (whose Tor subsidiary had already gone DRM-free) was the only Big Five publisher willing to...

The SFWA might just stay relevant after all
February 20, 2014 | 11:12 pm

apologycatHere’s an epilogue to the SFWA kerfuffle I posted about a couple of days ago: the central figure in the article, Sean Fodera, has posted a public apology to Mary Robinette Kowal for his unprofessional remarks (which she has accepted), and also a clarification on his attitude about women in SF. (The apology was apparently so popular that it caused SFF.net to go down for a while. It seems to be back up now, but just in case, screencaps are available at Radish Reviews.) In the apology, Fodera explains that his antipathy toward Kowal was not because she was a woman,...

wordpress analytics