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Posts tagged India

$35 Indian tablet makes its debut at $45 for students
October 5, 2011 | 12:25 pm

indiatabletIt looks like the vapor surrounding India’s $35 tablet has congealed directly into a solid. The Aakash tablet is being made by Canadian manufacturer Datawind, and the Indian government is ordering 100,000 of them at at 2,200 rupees per unit ($44.50), though Datawind says that a planned larger order will drop the effective price per unit down closer to $35. In two months, a SIM-slot-equipped version of the device, branded “Ubislate”, will be available to consumers for 2,999 rupees ($60.70). The tablet will have a 366MHz processor, 7” resistive touchscreen, 256Mb RAM, a 32Gb SD card slot, and two...

A look at India’s thriving publishing scene, part 2
July 8, 2011 | 10:07 am

Here's a link to the second part of Akshay Pathak's overview of the state of publishing in India today. Where Part 1 focused on the need for better data, professionally trained editors and a more robust retail infrastructure, Part 2 looks at the roles Indian publishers play in the global marketplace, as well as the growing issue of both print and digital piracy. But perhaps the most contentious business issue in Indian publishing today is a proposed amendment to India's copyright law. If passed, it would sanction parallel imports, in effect rendering territorial rights moot and introducing potentially devastating foreign...

A look at India’s thriving publishing scene, part 1
July 6, 2011 | 9:31 am

India's publishing industry is exploding, writes Akshay Pathak at Publishing Perspectives. An estimated 90,000 titles are produced each year, with annual growth estimated to be around 30%. Production standards are improving, there's fresh investment in retail, and there's a growing consumerist middle class. But there's not a lot of hard data yet. Bookscan only covers some of the bigger bookstore chains, and while there are an estimated 19,000 publishers today, no single professional association has more than 1,000 members. Pathak—who works from New Delhi with the Frankfurt Book Fair—identifies some areas for growth. India needs more editors who are better trained, he...

Print is dead…or not
April 27, 2011 | 11:20 pm

In a remarkable coincidence, today Zite gave me four articles in a row about “the future of books” or “the death of print”. I’m not sure what caused so many people to take a look ahead right out of the blue like this, but it seems like a good time to look at the articles and compare notes. On Singularity Hub Aaron Saenz points to the recent Kindle library news, and the rise of e-book sales as printed book sales decline. He suggests that digital downloads could become the majority of the market as early as 2015 or as...

Blogger: Send the third-world e-readers, not laptops
February 22, 2011 | 12:59 am

On PC Pro, Stuart Turton blogs on his experience showing his Kindle to inhabitants of a very poor area of central India. He reports that even though they could have no idea what it possibly was, all the kids who saw his device were enthralled by its nifty features, and even the adults of the village were excited by it. After about ten minutes, I let one of the kids play with it, but instead of trying to mess with the bells and whistles, he just started reading aloud. I was wrong before: this is the...

India’s $35 Android tablet apparently vaporous after all
January 20, 2011 | 2:28 pm

Remember that $35 Android tablet from India we reported on last year? The latest in a long line of Indian vaporware, praised by Nicholas Negroponte, it was supposed to receive educational subsidies and be made available to students—though reports surfaced that it was actually a Chinese Android tablet and not actually a home-grown device at all. Now India’s Economic Times has a report saying that the vendor who was to provide a guarantee bond to back the device’s production (in accordance with Indian legal requirements) has backed out of a $13 million commitment. According...

India: ebooks, public libraries and crossing the street, by Eric Hellman
December 21, 2010 | 3:49 pm

It sounds funny to say, but the thing I'll remember longest about my two weeks in India is learning to cross the street. When I first arrived, I didn't dare. Not only do they drive on the wrong side of the street, but they also drive on the right side of the street, the middle of the street, and on various surfaces that would not be considered streets here in New Jersey. The protocol for pedestrians and motorists to coexist was not apparent to me. Pedestrians seemed to cross the street with minimal regard for traffic; the cars unaccountably seemed to...

$35 Indian tablet actually Chinese HiVision Speedpad?
September 11, 2010 | 10:15 am

speedpad-android Indian Android news site Androidos.in has broken the news that the $35 “home-grown” tablet touted by the government of India (and lauded by OLPC’s Nicholas Negroponte) looks suspiciously similar (that is to say, identical) to Chinese manufacturer HiVision’s Speedpad Android tablet. AndroidOS reports that HiVision’s tablet was first seen at CeBIT in March, 2010, where it was predicted to retail for about $100. Androidos is not pleased by the discovery that this tablet, claimed to be the result of development at India’s top engineering colleges, has apparently turned out to be a Chinese import in actuality: ...

Java ebook reading allows huge growth for Wattpad
September 8, 2010 | 2:33 pm

allenlau.jpgI've mentioned Wattpad before and said that for the developing world Java ereading on cellphones is the way to go. This has inspired a few skeptical comments by readers over the years. Now, Publishing Perspectives had interviewed Wattpad co-founder, Allen Lau, pictured above. According to Wattpad’s analytics, English-speaking readers accounted for 42% of total e-readers, with the next largest group being Vietnamese readers at 36%. Why Vietnam? “Our strong mobile support is helping us a lot,” says Lau, who originally hails from Hong Kong. “I think in Vietnam, most people don’t have access to computers, and if they do want that, they have...

Indian ereader, the Wink, launched along with ebookstore and news service
August 20, 2010 | 10:25 am

Screen shot 2010-08-20 at 10.22.50 AM.pngAccording to CIOL, EC Media International has launched the Wink ereader in India. This is an e-ink unit and supports reading in 15 Indian languages. Along with the Wink, EC Media will be starting an ebook store which will give access to ebooks, journals, newspapers, magazines and selected articles. Currently there are 200 ebook titles in English, Hindi, Marathi and Malayan at the store and about 500 titles in other languages are expected to be added in the next six months. Wink has garnered content from Penguin, Roli, Oxford University, Harper Collins and Permanent Black so far, and...

$35 Indian tablet featured on TV show
August 12, 2010 | 2:11 am

croppedtablet2 Remember that $35 tablet from India that Nicholas Negroponte offered to help with? Engadget reports that it has made a hands-on appearance on an Indian TV show. (CNet also has coverage.) The device packs an awful lot of wallop for $35: 2GB RAM, wi-fi, 3G, microSD card storage, video out, a webcam, and Android. (It also picks up fingerprints at least as easily as the iPad.) India will be making the tablet available to universities and students in mid-2011, but there are no plans to market it to the general public yet. If it does hit the open...

India: more libraries going for digitization of knowledge, eresources
August 9, 2010 | 6:13 am

index.jpg From the Article: Leading educational institutes and libraries are making books immortal – virtually. Rare books and publications are now in the focus of many local and national-level projects of digitization. On academic front, projects like INFLIBNET, acronym for Information and Library Network Centre, hold great promise, believe experts. Dr Jagdish Arora, director of the project, told TOI that despite some glitches, the project was very much in shape. “Apart from providing over 70,000 books and 2,000 journals online, we have started a project called National Library and Information Services Infrastructure for scholarly content (N-LIST) from...

Negroponte offers OLPC tech to makers of India’s $35 tablet
August 2, 2010 | 6:22 am

Good Gear Guide posts an IDG News Service report that Nicholas Negroponte, chairman of the One Laptop Per Child initiative, has sent a note congratulating the Indian government on the $35 tablet it announced a few days ago, and has also offered India full access to OLPC hardware and software technology to help in manufacturing it. I can certainly understand why Negroponte made the offer. The goal of furthering world-wide education with cheap computers works whether we’re talking about a $100 XO tablet, or a $35 device from India. Still, I can’t help finding it a little...

India’s $35 tablet: Less vaporous than the ‘$10 laptop’?
July 26, 2010 | 9:15 am

india_tablet A couple of days ago, Paul mentioned the skeptical reaction that a new $35 tablet device from India is getting within India, but as far as I can tell we never actually went into any detail about the device itself. According to a post from our sister blog Gadgetell (linking an article at The Guardian), the device will be Linux powered and come with 2 GB of memory, video conferencing capability, and a USB port. It can run on solar panel, battery, or AC power. PC World also has an article looking at the device, and...

Indian $35 tablet treated with some skepticism in India itself
July 24, 2010 | 11:59 am

35-computer-taps-Indias.jpgFrom an article in The Times of India by Ajay Baishnav: ... The role of technology in furthering the cause of education in India is a far-fetched idea when we fail to fulfill even the basic conditions of schooling. When most of our government-run schools in the villages don't even have basic infrastructure such as furnished classrooms, blackboards and toilets, our officials are itching to bring in subsidized computing devices. These devices cannot compensate for our crumbling education infrastructure and absenteeism of teaching staff. Look at the issue another way. Let's say the government actually succeeds in distributing low-cost computers to kids...

Ereaders around the world – China and India
March 15, 2010 | 7:40 am

world.jpgChina: Shanghai Daily is reporting that Hanwang Technology Co. plants to open 60 customer "experience stores" to display and promote ereader products and online bookstore services. They opened their flagship store in Shanghai this weekend. India: Ereaders must be picking up because the Business Standard, datelined Mumbai, is reviewing two ereaders this week. One is from an online retailer Infibeam and is called the PI. Looks like a pretty typical e-ink unit and will retail for Rs 9,999. The other is the Sony Reader PRS-505, which is retailing for Rs 18,500. Thanks to Resource Shelf for...

For India, a $12 Apple II Nintendo Famicom desktop
August 5, 2008 | 11:07 am

Apple IIUpdate: Although I am leaving the text of the article below unchanged, a more recent Computerworld article brings to light the fact that the "$12 computer" sold in India is not in fact based on the Apple II at all, but rather on a contemporary piece of technology—the Nintendo Famicom. That the Famicom should have a computer based on it is not terribly surprising. Known as the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in America, the Japanese iteration of the Famicom (or "Family Computer") was a great deal more extensible than the American version, with a number of peripherals produced including a...

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