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Posts tagged Gutenberg

A Plaintive Cry from the E-Text Wilderness
October 25, 2012 | 10:53 pm

By Rob Suggs So many public domain e-texts, so little time—and guidance. That there's the rub. Ever had this happen? You spot an intriguing title in the Gutenberg feed, or on some other free text site. New e-reader food? Maybe. What's the book about? Like all public domain texts, it dates before the Great Rise of the Subtitles, sadly. So this thing is merely called "The Amazingly Indescribable Thing," or something equally vague, by Lucius Q. Oldenscribe. The cover is a photo of a ragged, black-clothed library book with that title. By sheer reflex, your eager little fingers are instantly Googling title and...

Chinese invented movable type 600 years before Gutenberg
May 17, 2012 | 9:11 am

This was too interesting to pass up.  From an article in io9: After centuries of woodblock printing, a humble man named Bi Sheng invented movable type in the 1000s. Movable type is a system where each character (or letter, if you're in a Western context) is carved or cast into a separate piece of material. These characters are then arranged on a block, inked, and pressed against paper. The characters can be rearranged as much as you like and reused — hence, the term "movable type."  Full size We don't have any examples of the books he produced, but we do have a remarkable...

The very first e-book is not what you think it was
October 23, 2011 | 12:03 pm

john-milton-paradise-lost-cover-1wyeqzuOn Snarkmarket, Tim Carmody takes a look at the interesting case of why Project Gutenberg has two copies of Milton’s Paradise Lost that were produced within a few months of each other. Project Gutenberg EBook #20, October 1991, was hand-typed by volunteer Judy Boss (who subsequently got a scanner). However, Project Gutenberg EBook #26, from February 1992, was a revision of, literally, the oldest etext known to Project Gutenberg. It pre-dates Hart’s famous decision to type the Declaration of Independence by a good six years, dating back to 1964-1965 and originally rendered in all capital letters by Dr. Joseph...

Catch up on the history of Project Gutenberg in 10 minutes
July 6, 2011 | 8:57 am

To commemorate its 40th anniversary this week, Marie Lebert wrote a short 15 page history of Project Gutenberg, from its first document on 4 July 1971 ("The United States Declaration of Independence"), to the founding of Distributed Proofreaders in 2000, to the posting of its 30,000th book this past April ("The Religions of Ancient Egypt and Babylonia"). You can download the PDF at gutenbergnews.org, and Mike Cook says that something with "more in-depth details" will follow. Via eBookNewser...

My Dad wants a Kobo
March 28, 2011 | 11:57 am

Me, blogging from parents' homeThis weekend I went down to my parents’ house, spending half of Saturday and most of Sunday visiting with my parents, brother and sister-in-law, and two-month-old niece, and blogging from home. (That’s me at left, blogging from my parents’ kitchen table with my Kobo and iPad visible in the background.) When I went, I took my new Kobo Wireless reader and the Literati I was reviewing with me. While the Literati didn’t last long, the Kobo made a lasting impression on my father. (I wish I’d remembered to photograph him reading it.) A longtime fan of Anthony Trollope,...

Does anybody know: how to read a Gutenberg mobi book on your iPad with Kindle software
October 30, 2010 | 12:41 am

does-anybodyReceived the following question. I certainly don't know the answer. To paraphrase the email: One can read a Gutenberg mobi ebook on the Kindle by simply emailing it to the Kindle's address and having it sent to the machine. However, you can't use this method to email a Gutenberg mobi ebook to the Kindle software on your iPhone or iPad. How can you get the Gutenberg ebook to the Kindle software on the iPhone or iPad - other than by buying the book from Amazon. The reason for this is to be able to keep the book in...

Gutenberg ebooks direct to the Kindle – the Magic Catalog
September 20, 2010 | 12:55 am

images.jpg In addition to the convenient Magic Catalog for Project Gutenberg, which is available for use on the Kindle for searches, browsing, and direct downloading of its free books to the Kindle (see below), Project Gutenberg recently made a MOBILE-device-oriented version of its website, which will of course work more quickly than the main website, via wireless conection with all Kindles.  The 'go to' address is http://m.gutenberg.org - but with Kindles it's better not to enter the "http://" part. While updating this entry for that news, I decided that since the last update was 5 months ago, the many who are new...

Quick Note: Leonardo Da Vinci’s “Notebooks” available on Gutenberg
September 10, 2010 | 1:41 am

quick note.pngI wasn't aware that the translation of these Notebooks was available as a Project Gutenberg ebook. However, eBookNewser ferreted this out. The book is a translation done by Jean Paul Richter and it's imprint date is 1888. You can find the book here. ...

After you’ve printed a book, what do you do with it? Gutenberg’s problem
September 1, 2010 | 6:20 am

51M-jGEhnAL._SL500_AA300_.jpgBoston.com's Tom Sococca has an absolutely fascinating interview with Andrew Pettegree, author of The Book in the Renaissance. The parallels between printers' problems at the time and the publishing industry today are legion. Inventing the printing press was not the same thing as inventing the publishing business. Technologically, craftsmen were ready to follow Gutenberg’s example, opening presses across Europe. But they could only guess at what to print, and the public saw no particular need to buy books. The books they knew, manuscript texts, were valuable items and were copied to order. The habit of spending money to read something...

Project Gutenberg turns its attention to cell phone reading
July 25, 2010 | 2:17 pm

cell_phone_with_pic A MobileRead forumgoer reports that the latest Project Gutenberg newsletter contains an announcement of a new Project Gutenberg mobile website, m.gutenberg.org. The site is to be optimized not just for iPhones, but for any mobile phone including browsing-enabled dumbphones. Writes Gutenberg: There are 4.5 billion such devices in the world, versus only 1.15 billion computers, and more and more readers, in spite of what the pundits say, are surfing, reading, and everything else on such mobile devices. We’ve previously covered a couple of stories—earlier this year, and last year—on the possibility of using...

The Internet, and its evolving user experience
June 20, 2010 | 7:08 pm

evolvinguser The Internet makes you smart. The Internet makes you stupid. The Internet is killing the content industry. The Internet is enabling the content industry. The noise about the good and bad things the Internet is doing is so pervasive, who knows what to believe anymore? John Naughton at The Guardian takes a good look at the fear and uncertainty surrounding the Internet, and posts a list of nine talking points to consider about the Internet to cut through all the confusion. It’s a bit long to summarize, but part of it is that we’re still too...

iPad/iPhone e-book app review: Stanza
April 26, 2010 | 12:50 pm

Stanza 001I’ve already looked at the other two of the original “big three” iPhone e-book apps. The third of these apps is Stanza, the EPUB reader from Lexcycle. Stanza has a lot in common with eReader. They’re both great apps for the iPhone, their reading models are similar, and Stanza even shares the ability to download and read eReader-format e-books—even those protected by DRM. And like eReader, Stanza’s future in the iPad era is uncertain. Lexcycle COO Neelan Choksi said in a comment posted on Lexcycle’s forum on March 15th, “Currently, there is no work being done to customize...