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Posts tagged e-book pricing

Latest Author Earnings Report shows Big Five cutting their own, authors’ throats to get Amazon
May 7, 2015 | 12:25 pm

The May 2015 Author Earnings Report, Hugh Howey and team's "sixth quarterly look at Amazon’s ebook sales," has just hit the web, and I'm going to precis some of its most important conclusions, while recommending that any writer in particular digest the whole thing. And as in the past, this carries the caveat that it is a biased report from a crew with an agenda, and that there will be a grab-bag of by now customary criticisms of its methodology, conclusions, etc. All the same, it's an important milestone document, not least as it's the first Author Earnings Report to...

More from Neil Gaiman on the Amazon/Hachette faceoff
September 4, 2014 | 12:25 pm

Neil Gaiman's views on the Amazon/Hachette spat seem to have evolved a little since Chris Meadows last reported on them in mid-June. According to an answer to a self-published author and fan recently posted on "the official Neil Gaiman Tumblr, but honestly no better than the unofficial Neil Gaiman Tumblrs out there," Gaiman now says: "I don’t see an enemy. I see two huge multinational corporations having a fight over contracts and terms, and authors staring up at them from ground level. It’s like Godzilla battling Gamera, and we’re looking up from the sidewalks of New York rather worried that...

Hachette responds to Amazon advocates’ email on pricing its e-books
August 11, 2014 | 1:24 am

Digital Book World is carrying the response Hachette CEO Michael Pietsch is sending to those people who write him at Amazon’s behest. Since I posted the Amazon letter in full, it seems only fair to do the same for this. Pietsch (or whoever wrote the response for him) maintains that “Hachette sets prices for our books entirely on our own, not in collusion with anyone” (technically true, I suppose, since he said books, not e-books). He also maintains that the vast majority of Hachette’s titles are priced at or below $9.99, that the ones that cost more are nonetheless...

Amazon says it would be content with 30% of revenue if Hachette e-books were $9.99
July 29, 2014 | 8:42 pm

Amazon has posted another update to its Kindle user forum, dispensing more information about the nature of the dispute between itself and Hachette. In fact, this is pretty much the clearest statement of what the actual argument covers that we have yet seen from either side, including those Hachette leakers. (And, interestingly enough, it doesn’t actually agree with some of the content of those leaks! Imagine that?) I haven’t looked for any reactions yet, but I predict the same howls of outrage we got with Amazon’s last such announcement in May, from Hachette partisans complaining that Amazon didn’t have...

DBW 2013: Piracy Does Harm Sales
January 16, 2013 | 6:32 pm

Digital Book World just published a report that piracy does harm sales and backed it up with a list of 25 studies that prove the point. Okay, splashy headline. You can agree or disagree with it, your choice. What I found interesting were the recommendations to publishers: 1. Make content available online 2. Use existing anti-piracy laws Those are excellent suggestions, and, oh, by the way, the exact suggestions many in the e-reading world have made for years. As I said in my introduction post, I used to be a pirate. Why did I stop? Because the books I wanted finally became available in...

Amazon to win EU e-book pricing tussle with Apple
November 6, 2012 | 8:15 pm

European Union regulators are to end an antitrust probe into e-book prices by accepting an offer by Apple and four publishers to ease price restrictions on Amazon, two sources said on Tuesday. That decision would hand online retailer Amazon a victory in its attempt to sell e-books cheaper than rivals in the fast-growing market publishers hope will boost revenue and increase customer numbers. Read Full Article ... Source: Reuters Follow us @TeleRead  Join us on Facebook...

GenCon Interview: Self-publishing author Michael Stackpole (Part Three)
December 31, 2011 | 7:15 pm

Here is the third ten minutes of the thirty-minute discussion I had with Michael Stackpole at GenCon a few months ago. I’m a little embarrassed that it took this long for me to sit down and type it all up. The first part can be found here, and the second here. Stackpole is best known for his extensive work in writing BattleTech and Star Wars tie-in novels, and he also wrote the novelization of the recent Conan movie. We have covered Stackpole’s blog posts on self-publishing fairly extensively over the last few months, as well as his GenCon panel...

E-book sticker shock redux: Slowing the industry, missing the point
December 18, 2011 | 8:23 pm

The Wall Street Journal article on e-book sticker shock that we covered a couple of days ago has been drawing a number of reactions. CBS Marketwatch offers a piece noting that the high e-book prices are slowing the growth of the industry. It points out that e-book prices have implications for e-reader prices, too, because consumers won’t want to pay high prices for an e-reader if they’re going to have to pay a lot for the books, too. The question is who gets hurt worse. According to the Journal, both Amazon and industry executives claim that...

GenCon Interview: Self-publishing author Michael Stackpole (Part Two)
September 16, 2011 | 12:15 pm

Here is the second ten minutes of the thirty-minute discussion I had with Michael Stackpole at GenCon last month. I will be posting the final part in days to come. The first part can be found here. Stackpole is best known for his extensive work in writing BattleTech and Star Wars tie-in novels, and he also wrote the novelization of the recent Conanmovie. We have covered Stackpole’s blog posts on self-publishing fairly extensively over the last few months, as well as his GenCon panel seminar. In this segment, we discuss piracy, e-book pricing, editing, and the “Storyteller’s Bowl”...

France passes e-book price-fixing law
May 18, 2011 | 10:39 am

The French e-book price-fixing law, which we mentioned in October and again earlier this month, has passed the French National Assembly, the Bookseller reports. The bill says that retailers both inside and outside of France must respect its price requirements, which conflicts with European Union law and will likely lead to a confrontation with the European Commission. It seems that price-fixing, whether by governments or publishers, is becoming very popular for e-books. Of course, many European countries like France already fix the price of printed books, so adding a similar clause for electronic ones is only to be expected....

Pricing puzzler: Diane Duane finds e-book sells better at $4.99 than $1.99
May 16, 2011 | 12:24 pm

E-book pricing can sometimes be counterintuitive. I mentioned a couple of months ago that Diane Duane was removing her e-book A Wind from the South from free distribution and offering it up for sale on Amazon. Now she finds that it is actually selling considerably better at $4.99 than at $1.99. She wonders: Could it be that, when you’re an author who’s been established in print for a while, that it’s not smart to price your book too low? Is it possible that people look at it and say, “Oh, this thing must be cheap because...

UK blogger complains about e-book price gouging
May 3, 2011 | 11:05 pm

pound_signThe US isn’t the only place where publisher e-book prices are higher than some consumers would like. While we’ve carried a number of examples where the e-book price was higher than the paper book price, most of them have focused on America. But on his blog nikf.org, Nik Fletcher rants about some British Kindle e-book price gouging. Fletcher calls back to the Metro article on piracy I mentioned here, and suggests that high pricing might be a contributing factor. He brings up the example of a Jeffrey Archer novel that is priced at £9.99 (£11.99 MSRP) for the Amazon...

Epic Games president decries 99-cent games
April 23, 2011 | 2:42 pm

Epic_LogoDid you think digital cheap was only giving print publishers conniptions? Think again. Reminiscent of publishers’ feelings about 99-cent self-published e-books, Industry Gamers has a brief piece based on a talk with Mike Capps, president of Epic Games (the company behind the widely-used Unreal Engine for first/third person shooters) in which Capps suggests that the increasing prevalence of cheap iPhone and iPad games is doing traditional video gaming in. "If there's anything that's killing us [in the traditional games business] it's dollar apps," he lamented. "How do you sell someone a $60 game that's really...

E-books, hardcovers, and pricing: Will publishers ever learn?
April 2, 2011 | 1:35 pm

The Digital Reader is carrying an article by Eric Landes, a technical writer dabbling in fiction, looking at the question of e-book pricing from an outsider’s perspective. Landes considers the changes that are taking place across the publishing industry, how the industry is responding by pricing its e-books, and how the industry ought to price its e-books. Landes starts off by noting that the mainstream print publishing world has two major sales factors that account for most of its money—hardcovers and bestsellers. Hardcovers cost little more to manufacture than paperbacks but retail for twice (Landes is being conservative here,...

E-book pricing hinges on customer perception of value
March 23, 2011 | 12:38 pm

As if in response to the last article’s dismissal of the $.99-$2.99 price point, O’Reilly Radar has a brief interview with Todd Sattersten of BizBookLab about the pricing issue. Sattersten points out that the main issue at hand is consumer perception of value. Consumers see that everything else digital is cheaper than the physical equivalent, and think e-books vs. books should be the same way. He brings up the example of a print book that’s cheaper than an e-book, explaining “That creates a short circuit in customers' brains. You don't pay more for things that are more convenient....

An economic argument on e-book price
March 21, 2011 | 10:15 am

Courtney Milan (photo by Jovanka Novakovic)Historical romance novelist Courtney Milan has written an essay on her blog demolishing one of the economic arguments that tends to come up in discussions over e-book price. This argument suggests that the price of e-books should drop to nothing because “in a perfectly competitive marketplace, the price will tend towards the marginal cost of distribution, which for digital goods is zero.” The problem with this argument, Milan points out, is that it only applies in situations where competing goods are perfect substitutes for each other. In e-books, that is not the case. Because each book is different and...

Can ads in e-books fight piracy with low prices?
February 7, 2011 | 12:16 am

A pair of pieces on piracy and e-books caught my eye. One is a blog post by literary agent Nicholas Croce, on fighting piracy with e-book ads. Croce thinks that ads could work financially, in ways that were not possible before. They could be digitally updated to remain current, and be customized to reader demographics. And by being financially relevant, they could lower the cost of e-books to the point where piracy becomes less attractive. According to copyright protection company Attributor, unauthorized downloads of books have cost American publishers $2.8 billion dollars to date in...

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