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Posts tagged DRM

The pirate pay? BitTorrent survey finds users more likely to buy
November 24, 2014 | 4:29 pm

BitTorrentLogo.pngGood news for authors and creatives out there - if you're prepared to believe its source. According to a BitTorrent user survey reported by Torrent Freak - though so far at least I've been unable to access this via BitTorrent Inc. itself - "BitTorrent users are 170% more likely to have paid for digital music in the past six months and are 8x more likely to have a music streaming account when compared to the average Internet user." And there is no reason to assume that figures for ebooks would look any different - meaning that what is reputedly one...

Why we need an e-book DRM DMCA exemption
October 30, 2014 | 8:54 pm

It’s that time again. Ars Technica reports that the Copyright Office is accepting petitions on activities to exempt from the DMCA’s anti-circumvention provisions, making it legal to crack DRM for certain restricted purposes. We’ve reported on this procedure a few times over the last few years. The way it goes is that various people or organizations make proposals and the copyright office considers whether to grant them for the next three years. The exemptions then have to be requested again at the next session if they are to continue. Public Knowledge will be submitting requests to legalize...

ALA welcomes Adobe action, voices concern over ebook vendor data retention
October 28, 2014 | 12:25 pm

AmericanLibraryAssociationThe American Library Association (ALA) has just issued a statement welcoming Adobe's software update fix for its much-publicized ebook reader data leak from Adobe Digital Editions, but also took the occasion to warn of the problems and risks created by continuing data retention by most ebook platform operators, publishers, and retailers. Carolyn Anthony and Erika Linke, co-chairs of  the ALA Digital Content Working Group (DCWG), said: Librarians have long been guardians of and advocates for reader privacy. The plain text transmission of reader data by Adobe Digital Editions over the internet was clearly a privacy violation for all users of the ADE...

Morning Links: Review of new $79 Kindle. S&S to dip toe into DRM-free waters
October 13, 2014 | 8:55 am

kindleReview: $79 Kindle (2014) (The Digital Reader) The Kindle (2014) features a somewhat faster processor, touchscreen, and additional storage, but no frontlight or high resolution screen. It’s running basically the same software as the Kindle Paperwhite was running last month, which means that the new Kindle is still lacking the many new features which Amazon promised to add in a firmware update this fall. *** Adobe’s Latest E-Book Misstep: This Time, It’s Not the DRM (Copyright and Technology) More actual facts about this sorry case will emerge in the coming days, no doubt, leading to a fully clear picture of what Adobe is doing...

When DRM infects the non-digital world
October 6, 2014 | 12:25 pm

drmHere's an update on a quirky story I reported on earlier this year. An Ontario coffee roaster is suing Keurig Green Mountain for $600 million for engaging in anti-competition practices by embedding "DRM" into their latest model of single-serving coffee machine. As CBC reports the issue is that the patent on Keurig's 'k-cup' coffee pods has now expired, which has opened the door to other manufacturers such as Club Coffee (the complainant in this case) to make their own 'pods' for use in these machines. This is cutting into Keurig's profit, obviously---when they were the exclusive source for the pods, they...

Barnes & Noble removes ability to download its e-books outside of the Nook ecosystem
September 18, 2014 | 9:54 pm

I’m hesitant to believe this story Nate’s reporting, even after clicking the links and reading the sources for myself. How could anyone in the modern e-book market be this dumb? But the writing seems to be on the wall. Barnes & Noble has removed the “Download” button from its e-book library,  [Update: Nate’s posted another piece indicating B&N cited “security” as the reason for the change.] It’s no longer possible to download a book directly from the B&N web site to your hard drive by saving it from your B&N e-book library through your browser. And that...

Morning Roundup: Yes, books are consumer goods. Amazon accounts hacked through Kindle books
September 16, 2014 | 9:00 am

amazonYour Amazon Account Can be Hacked Via a Kindle Book (The Digital Reader) Amazon might not have a security issue at Audible but they do have one on their main website. *** Free Samples of NBA's Young People's Literature Longlist (GalleyCat) The National Book Foundation has revealed its first ever Young People’s Literature Longlist for the National Book Award (NBA). *** HarperCollins Adds Security Layer to eBook Files (Digital Book World) The anti-piracy solution embeds unique, imperceptible and traceable digital watermarks into e-books, enabling distributors and publishers to track where their content is appearing online and identify the sources of leakage and unauthorized distribution. *** Authors United May...

Webcomic ‘Help Desk’ takes on e-book DRM
July 23, 2014 | 11:20 am

drm-rollIf you could use a good chuckle, webcomic “Help Desk” has just started a storyline focusing on e-book DRM. (The storyline then continues here.) It seems to have been inspired by the letter that Cory Doctorow received from Hachette about DRM. Since some authors publish with Tor in the USA but Hachette in the UK, and Tor went DRM-free two years ago, this means the US edition of their book would be DRM-free. Hachette didn’t like that, and wanted authors to insist that Tor put DRM on that edition to protect the sales of their UK edition. The letter was actually posted...

July Author Earnings report surveys DRM, genre sales
July 18, 2014 | 3:34 am

ae-julyHugh Howey and Data Guy have done it again, producing another interesting report on a sample of data scraped from Amazon. The July report re-runs the numbers for their main chart based on the new data, then branches out into a couple of interesting new measurements—including one that I specifically asked for back in May. The main measurements show basically incremental change from the last few reports, In terms of daily revenue to authors (taking into account royalty percentages from publisher sales and Amazon revenue percentages from self-published works), Big Five authors take 37% of total Amazon daily revenue...

Dumping DRM is not a panacea
June 20, 2014 | 12:23 pm

As I’ve watched the e-book market develop, I’ve gradually lost a good deal of patience with the argument that DRM is the thing keeping people locked into the Amazon Kindle ecosystem. The latest example to pop up comes via Cory Doctorow’s latest column in The Guardian (found via BoingBoing). Doctorow feels Hachette is hoist by its own petard because of the DRM it insists Amazon (and the other e-book stores) use. It’s an old, old argument. And make no mistake, I don’t like DRM myself and would be just as glad if it all went away tomorrow. But Doctorow...

Morning Roundup: Digital vs Print, Pocket adds premium service and more
May 29, 2014 | 9:00 am

digital vs printDigital vs Print: What is the Future of Reading? (Digital Book World) This is a topic that has headlined presentations since the digital revolution began, but interestingly, we still don’t have the full picture of what reading will look like in even one year, let alone ten, fifty, or one hundred years. *** Accepting Amazon's DRM Makes it Impossible to Challenge its Monopoly (Techdirt) Monopoly, of course, is economically the correct term. Publishers of books that are restricted by copyright have a set of exclusive rights granted to them by law. Their monopoly looks distinct from Amazon's near-monopoly bookseller position, though, because it's one...

Whither the Kindle Killer?
May 29, 2014 | 7:01 am

Broken-KindleFound via Slashdot: Larry Press plaintively wonders why nobody’s come up with a “Kindle Killer” yet. He notes a whole host of ways the Kindle falls short of perfection—lack of voice recognition or full interface capability with a computer, for example—and thinks such a device really should be a “low-hanging fruit” for one of the big device makers. I’ll tell you why, Larry. The demand isn’t there. Maybe folks like you who like to get the most out of their devices would want such a thing, but the vast majority of the lowest-common-denominator general public—the ones who actually buy...