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Posts tagged doj

Inkling Books’ Michael W. Perry responds …
September 14, 2012 | 2:56 pm

Michael W. Perry's political rant about the cause and ramifications of the DoJ price-fixing case definitely touched a nerve this week with a good number of readers. Some of you found Perry's thought-process and logic to be a bit twisted, while others didn't think the essay had any place being published on TeleRead at all, given its rather over-the-top political overtone. Perry has since responded with a 2,200-word comment, and it's nothing if not a doozy. Click here to give it a read....

Inkling Books’ Michael W. Perry on the DoJ’s E-Book Price-Fixing Settlement
September 12, 2012 | 12:17 pm

By Michael W. Perry Yes, the judge in the Google Book Settlement clearly listened to what writers were saying, particularly [the approximately] 90 percent of them who wrote in opposition to it (including me). This judge seems less open to news from the trenches or the facts of the case. Keep in mind that there’s another and more mature market that demonstrates just how effective agency pricing can be at keeping prices down and quality high. That’s the apps for Apple’s iDevices. One reason I opted for the latest iPad rather than a MacBook Air is the marvelously low prices for impressive...

How To Understand the DoJ’s E-Book Pricing Settlement
September 11, 2012 | 12:43 am

It's been my experience that avid readers tend to be the sorts of people who take great pride in their intelligence. And intelligent people, for reasons that are obvious enough, aren't always forthcoming when they encounter complicated subjects they don't entirely understand. I mention this because I suspect that a decent portion of the e-reading community is having a hard time wrapping its collective head around the now-approved e-book pricing settlement situation. And that's a shame, because this particular case offers anyone who's interested a fantastic opportunity to observe the process of free-market capitalism in all its exquisite absurdity. I'll be the first to admit that all the...

Agency Pricing Settlement: Higher prices on the way?
September 10, 2012 | 2:32 pm

An article over at Paid Content proposes an interesting theory: That the recent Department of Justice ruling on the agency pricing issue could actually lead to higher book prices—not lower. This seems inexplicable at first: Only three of the Big Six publishers were named in the ruling, but the others may find themselves lowering prices in order to compete. And retailers are free to discount books as they see fit—packaging them into bundles, and so on. So ... where's the problem? The problem is that there's a clause in the settlement, stating that the retailers' discounts cannot exceed their commissions overall. (No...

Three Publishers Settle with 49 States
August 30, 2012 | 4:55 pm

Bloomberg Businessweek seems to have been one of the first publications to report that 54 attorneys general in (49 states and five American territories) have collectively reached a $69 million antitrust settlement with Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins Publishers LLC and Simon & Schuster Inc., "over alleged price-fixing for electronic books." According to a press release from the Office of the Attorney General of the State of Connecticut, the three publishers "have agreed to pay a total of more than $69 million to consumers to resolve antitrust claims of an alleged unlawful conspiracy to fix the prices of electronic books (eBooks). They have also...

DOJ compares Apple to Big Oil
August 23, 2012 | 4:00 pm

For those of you who might be trying desperately to keep up with the Department of Justice's ebooks case, but are nevertheless finding yourselves falling behind (or falling asleep, even, every time you attempt to plow through another dry-as-tree-bark news report), I'd suggest this recent update from PaidContent. [Title: "DOJ compares Apple and publishers to big oil in ebooks case.] (How can you not read a story with a headline like that?) At any rate, here's the main takeaway: "In a filing late Wednesday in response to Apple and book publishers, the Department of Justice reiterates its claim that agency pricing and...

Crain’s New York Business profiles Tor DRM-free e-book store plans
June 26, 2012 | 7:06 pm

Crain’s New York Business has a profile of Tor’s plan for a DRM-free e-book store. (The article is paywalled, but you can read it via Google News search.) It summarizes the situation with the DoJ antitrust lawsuit, and points to that suit and the success of the DRM-free Harry Potter e-book store as the reason publishers are seriously considering DRM-free options. That said, there is some new material here. Tor founder Tom Doherty and manager of science fiction Patrick Nielsen Hayden talk about wanting to build the kind of “diverse retail economy” you see in bookstores, and are in...

DOJ Lawsuit Update: Where Windowing Becomes Important, by Jane Litte
May 16, 2012 | 9:53 am

Screen Shot 2012 05 16 at 9 51 57 AM Introduction There are two major updates in the DOJ lawsuit.  An additional 17 states have sued the publishers and Apple.  Judge Denise Cote’s filed a denial of Apple, Penguin, and Macmillan’s motion to dismiss.  You may want to read the Primer here if you haven’t already before going forward. States Attorneys General Amended Complaint 1)  An additional 17 states have joined the existing states that have filed suit against the major publishers and Apple bringing the total number up to 31. Those states include: Texas, Comiecticut, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York,...

Sometimes I get it right – I predicted the DoJ antitrust case!
April 29, 2012 | 11:35 pm

Images I don't toot my own horn on TeleRead, and as a matter of fact generally don't even make any comments, because I feel the blog should not be about me.  However, I was going through some old stuff over the weekend and I found someting I had forgotten about and that made me proud.  In an article I wrote about my disagreeing with Mike Shatzkin on his praise of the, then new, agency model I discussed how resale price maintenance, which is exemplified by the agency model, has been relatively recently approved by the Supreme Court, and then I went...

The Department of Justice vs. eBooks II
April 23, 2012 | 9:13 am

Images As I noted in the first part of this article (see The Department of Justice vs. eBooks I), the settlement proposed by the DOJ raises a lot of issues but doesn’t attack the central premise that agency pricing is okay. I mentioned in part I that publishers could raise the list/wholesale prices of not-yet-published ebooks. But there is another option that could prove to be even more effective: Publishers are not obligated to give ebooksellers a 50% or higher discount as the wholesale price. Publishers could limit the wholesale discount to 30%, which would reflect the current 70-30 split that comes...

What to expect when you’re expecting a publisher/DoJ settlement
April 17, 2012 | 12:08 am

On PaidContent, Laura Hazard Owen has written a handy little guide to the implications of the DoJ-imposed settlement terms for readers. She discusses the effects that readers can expect to see as the settlement takes effect, sometime after the comment period ends in June. Readers will see the most effects on books published by Simon & Schuster, Hachette, and HarperCollins, the three publishers who meekly chose to settle with the DoJ, though those effects won’t start until June, when the 60-day comment period on the settlement is up. When it takes effect, publishers will have one week...

Explanation of the Settlement between DOJ Hachette, Harper Collins and S&S and What Happens Next, by Jane Litte
April 12, 2012 | 10:10 am

Screen Shot 2012 03 11 at 8 41 11 AM The DOJ filed suit against five publishers (Penguin, Macmillan, Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster) on April 11, 2012.  The DOJ then immediately filed a notice of settlement and a request for approval of the settlement.  A judge assigned to this case will then either approve the settlement and order the parties back to the negotiating table.  Any interested party has the right to write a statement to the court within 60 days to encourage or discourage acceptance of the proposed settlement. Two things are at issue here: 1) The restriction on retailers ability to discount books and 2) The Most Favored Nation clause...