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Posts tagged discovery

Big Publishing’s latest author discovery wheeze: YouTube celebrity deals
October 14, 2014 | 4:25 pm

YouTubeThe Next Big Thing in author discovery, according to a Wall Street Journal article anyway, is YouTube. Book promo videos have been a coming thing for a while now, as any fule kno. But now Big Publishing is turning the equation round, by using the power of rich social media to discover rather than to market authors. One of the key titles in the new surge of YouTube celeb signings is - appropriately enough - “The Pointless Book,” by UK video blogger Alfie Deyes. Then there's also "Make Up," by YouTube makeover celeb Michelle Phan. And unsurprisingly, the names of the...

Simon & Schuster launches social media initiative with Milq … who?
October 8, 2014 | 10:25 am

Simon & SchusterIn a news item that made it all the way to the top slot on Publishing Talk Daily, Simon & Schuster has just demonstrated how totally well it gets this social media stuff by announcing an exclusive book publisher partnership with Milq. That's right: Milq. Yes, you heard it: Milq. In case you're wondering ... um ... Milq who? well, so did I. Never fear, though: "As reported on in an article by Ben Sisario in The New York Times, Milq debuted out of private beta earlier this year with the aim of becoming the front door for how people experience...

No Names, No Jackets: E-Book Discovery Site I Really Like
June 26, 2013 | 12:15 pm

Books on Board Now this is a good idea! No Names, No Jackets is a news(ish) e-book discovery site I saw referenced in several places today (including in a comment to my post from yesterday). I had to check it out, and I like it. The idea is simple. The site is a list of sample chapters. No author names, no titles, no book jackets, no marketing blurbs or anything else. Just pure text. Because it's a WordPress site, it displays perfectly on my tablet. (I know what I'll be doing most evenings now.) You can specify genre or just browse through the archive. You...

The Book Elf: Another Attempt to Share E-Books
June 25, 2013 | 6:27 pm

Ah, will it never cease? Darn you readers for wanting to treat e-books like paper books, and wanting to actually share them! So, yet another e-book sharing method is coming. It's called The Book Elf (cute name), and while they are starting out with public domain books, they say they'll be bringing on copyrighted content soon. The idea is simple. Users can add books on their shelf to share (read: lend) to their friends. They won't use DRM file formats but will instead build DRM into the website. I'll be interested to see how that works, and how users will transfer books to...

Are e-book discovery studies missing important avenues?
June 24, 2013 | 7:30 pm

Morning Links I was drafting an article in response to one of our Morning Roundup articles (the one on the exaggerated death of the paperback), and I was looking for studies on e-book discovery to disprove one of the points in the article (that e-books aren't discovered online). Unfortunately, every study I found proved the point in the article. One study, by paidContent, was particularly damning. It showed that while book readers were active on the Internet, visiting sites like Pinterest and Goodreads regularly, those visits didn't drive e-book purchases. Drat! So much for that article idea. There's a chart in the article, which isn't approved...

Why the Failure of Books on Board Should Worry Authors
April 8, 2013 | 3:00 pm

Books on BoardIn today's Morning Links was a great essay from Michael Kozlowski on the 'death' of the indie e-bookstore. Books on Board was killed by the agency pricing model, and a failure to innovate and provide better customer experiences such as mobile browsing and more refined search algorithms, Kozlowski alleges. His conclusion, in particular, jumped out at me: "Indie bookseller websites are less about just selling books in the traditional sense, and more about reaching the largest audience you can. There is room in the industry for smaller players, but they have to be savvy. Opening up a Facebook Book Store, developing apps, making a...

Check out Book Bub, a great book recommending service
March 19, 2013 | 2:47 pm

On the advice of a TeleRead commenter, I've spent the last two weeks trying out a book recommending service called Book Bub. So far, I'm enjoying it. Book Bub's premise is simple: When you register (it's free), you select from an offering of genres that interest you, and every day, Book Bub sends you an email with a few free or discounted books in your chosen genres. That's all there is to it. In general, I'm finding Book Bub's one, single email a bit easier for me to keep track of than a blog these days—I still haven't decided what I plan...

Feeling Bookish: CEO Ardy Khazaei on the real aims—and real benefits—of the publisher joint venture
March 16, 2013 | 4:45 pm

BookishWhile it’s odd to think of an organization backed by the  Penguin, Hachette and Simon & Schuster as a startup, Bookish, the new book-recommendation and -discovery site is essentially that. After two years in development under three CEOs, Bookish is now a reality, a place where users can get recommendations—based on titles or groups of titles they know they already like—and then, importantly, purchase them. Like the Random House project BookScout, the idea, on one level, is to facilitate discovery across the industry, for the good of the industry. And while users can discover just about any book, the books they can purchase...

Meet WebBytez, a new method of e-book discovery
March 9, 2013 | 12:45 pm

E-book discovery by readers has been much in the news lately, and it's definitely an issue for authors, especially those who are self-published. While readers continue to find their next great book in online stores, some still browse brick and mortar bookstores. Wouldn't it be nice if they could find and buy e-books in a store? No, not showrooming Books-A-Million to buy a book on Amazon. Buy actually buying the e-book in the store, so that the author and the store both make money on the deal. Bitingduck Press has an answer. It's still new, so don't look for it yet...

Weekend Reading Roundup — Is book discovery only a problem for publishers?
February 16, 2013 | 9:14 am

Brown's Nautical AlmanacHere's the problem with publishers' book discovery problem (Paid Content) Why Stephen King was wrong to publish 'Guns' as a Kindle Single (NY Daily News) Amazon to Investigate Claims of Worker Intimidation at German Centers (New York  Times) Publishing is tough these days — unless you're in nautical almanacs, apparently (The Guardian) Kindle Daily Deals: 'Beautiful Creatures' books for $2.99 (and 3 others)  ...

Bookish Impressions
February 7, 2013 | 9:30 am

Bookish has launched with much fanfare. Some good. Some bad. Nate over at The Digital Reader had an amusing look at their terms of service. DBW has three reasons they will succeed and three reasons they will fail. Hedging their bets much? So I decided to try using the site and assess it from a usability perspective. The first thing I tried didn't work out so well. There's a big box in the middle of the page that says "Enter a Book." I assumed I would enter a book title and get some recommendations based on that title. Failing that, I thought at...

A conversation with Amanda Close about BookScout, Random House’s new discoverability app
February 1, 2013 | 1:00 pm

  By Brian Howard Last week, following a soft-launch the week prior, Random House marched out BookScout, a Facebook app designed to link readers with books they'll like but might not have discovered on their own. The recommendation engine draws on a user's "likes"—both on one's Facebook timeline and then directly through the app. Intriguingly, BookScout is not purely a Random House recommendation engine—it'll tip readers to any book in print, regardless of whether it was published by its own imprint Knopf, Big Six rival HarperCollins, indie McSweeney's or even Amazon Publishing. Though the app's early reviews have been mixed (I've found its recommendations to...