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Posts tagged digital

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Public Knowledge, John Villasenor, The Software Alliance (BSA)
June 4, 2014 | 7:31 am

Previously in this series: House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Graphic Artists Guild, Owners’ Rights Initiative House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Matthew B. Glotzer, New York Public Library Here’s the last batch (so far) of documents from the first sale House subcommittee hearing. If any additional material becomes available, I’ll pick that up down the line. Public Knowledge The first document for this entry comes from Sherwin Siy,...

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Matthew B. Glotzer, New York Public Library
June 3, 2014 | 12:14 pm

Previously in this series: House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Graphic Artists Guild, Owners’ Rights Initiative This post continues a theme from the last couple, in which one side’s statement is for preserving/extending first sale, and the other is against it. Which is kind of stretching a point, given that the “pro” post really isn’t about digital resale and the con post isn’t against physical resale, but still, I take what I can get. This time...

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Graphic Artists Guild, Owners’ Rights Initiative
June 3, 2014 | 5:04 am

oriPreviously in this series: House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi Here are two more documents from yesterday’s first sale hearing. Like yesterday’s pair, they’re a half-and-half split: one in favor of expanding first sale, the other concerned over what the implications might be. We begin with the concerned one. Graphic Artists Guild Writing on behalf of the Graphic Artists Guild, Ed Shems explains graphic artist concerns over the possible expansion of fair use in a 5-page PDF. Graphic artists, Shems explains, frequently license their work rather than selling it outright. This allows them to tailor their fees...

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi
June 2, 2014 | 4:54 pm

We’ve covered the history of efforts to implement resale of digital goods before (more than once, in fact), and there’s been quite a discussion of why it would be a bad idea. Now it’s Congress’s turn to talk about it. Today a House subcommittee held a hearing concerning first sale and how it related to digital items. InfoDocket has links to the prepared remarks of a number of the attendees, as well as the opening statement by Representative Bob Goodlatte. Noting the importance of the first sale doctrine, Goodlatte said Although some legal doctrines...

British printers struggle to cope with shift toward digital media
April 15, 2014 | 5:46 pm

printingpressMy friend Michael Brotzman pointed out this story to me from the New York Times, about how the printing industry in Britain is coping with the decreased demand for its services. Even as high technology leads to printers that can print bigger runs, faster, more efficiently, and with fewer operators, demand is dwindling and so are employees. The British printing industry is down from an estimated 200,000 workers in 2001 to fewer than 125,000 now. And for the jobs that are left, the UK is more and more often having to compete with lower labor costs of printers in continental...

Message to booksellers: The publisher is not your friend!
July 18, 2013 | 12:30 pm

This headline may not come as a revelation to many booksellers, but for those still taken in by the likes of David Carr, and by recent statements around Independent Booksellers Week in the UK implying that the Big Five are friends of the little high street booksellers, here is some new perspective on current developments that really show how publishers are jumping into the Amazon/e-book camp, and deserting the print book retailers they purport to defend. Quoted recently in Britain's The Bookseller, Tim Hely Hutchinson, CEO of Big Five player Hachette UK, stated in his annual letter to authors that combined...

The Future of Onscreen Words
June 18, 2013 | 8:01 pm

onscreen wordsBy Tom Chatfield What does the act of typing onto billions of Internet-connected screens mean for the future of language? Note: This is a specially edited and expanded excerpt from my new book about technology and language, "Netymology". I’ve never understood those who lament the Internet as a kind of death for the English language. From photos and music to games and videos, mixed media surround us as never before. But billions upon billions of words still begin, end and inform our reactions to almost every single item on our screens. From “likes” and comments to text messages and status updates, language lurks...

Wondering what to do with all those cell phone photos and digital videos? A new e-book has the answer.
April 16, 2013 | 5:56 pm

e-bookMike McEnaney spent nearly 10 years working as both an editor and a publisher of B2B photography and digital photography magazines for North American Publishing Company (NAPCO), the same organization that owns and operates both TeleRead and the Technology Tell network of websites. Very recently, though, McEnaney struck out on his own. And somehow, along with fellow journalist Greg Scoblete, he has already managed to launch Your Digital Life, a website about the digital photography revolution. McEnaney and Scoblete's latest project, however, is an e-book, also about the world of digi-photography. From Fleeting to Forever: Enjoying & Preserving Your Digital Photos and Videos, as...

Is Digitization Enabling Minimalism for a New Generation?
December 6, 2012 | 4:23 pm

An interesting article in The Toronto Star looks at young urbans who are embracing more minimalist lifestyles by cutting clutter and consumption in favor of more experience-based lives. The article points to several factors underlying this trend including health, economic factors and 'the disposal nature of fast fashion and cheap electronics.' But it fails to fully explore what the digital revolution has really done for the aspiring minimalist, and that's 'enable them to have all the stuff they want without requiring physical real estate for it to inhabit.' My Beloved and I lead a pretty simple life. We work; we relax at...

European game store chain Game Group illustrates perils of not going digital in time
March 26, 2012 | 11:38 pm

game-store-mEarlier today, I blogged Mike Shatzkin’s post that bookstores may be going away and it might be a good idea for publishers to do more to keep them around. In that post, Shatzkin mentioned a statistic that 40% of all UK “high street” shops might have gone away within 5 years. I came across a possible example of that sort of thing today on PaidContent. It seems that the largest European plastic-box video game retailer, Game Group, is in financial trouble. It has closed 277, almost half, of its 609 UK and Ireland stores, and has called in administrators...

Newspapers should move to digital, rethink content strategies, says Independent Content CEO
February 26, 2012 | 4:39 pm

Here’s another of those “the print ship is sinking, hurry up and get off it” posts you see every so often, this one a guest post on TechCrunch by Jordan Kurzweil, co-CEO of digital business agency Independent Content. Kurzweil starts by recommending that newspapers “face reality”: - The audiences of traditional print brands on paper and pixel are aging. - Digital upstarts are capturing the new audiences, and stealing your least loyal current readers. - The cost structures of Old Print companies are out of whack with the times....

Seth Godin sees bare-bones future of books thanks to long tail
December 30, 2011 | 2:15 pm

Marketing guru Seth Godin has a piece on PaidContent (reposted from his Domino Project blog) responding to an interview with the head of Ingram Books about the future of books and publishing. In the interview, Ingram CEO David “Skip” Prichard trots out some of the usual predictions about the future of the book—multimedia extras, print-on-demand, physical bookstores finding “niches” to adapt to, and print publishers still being necessary. Godin calls Prichard’s views “economically ridiculous,” basing his argument on Chris Anderson’s “long tail” theory. Godin suggests that the broad consumer choice the long tail makes possible will drive down production...