Follow us on
Connect
More on TechnologyTell: Gadget News | Apple News

Posts tagged copyright reform

Nature Publishing Group attempts immoral moral rights land grab
April 3, 2014 | 12:25 pm

The struggle between scientific publishers and the academic community over open access policies has taken a new and striking turn. Not only is the Nature Publishing Group, publisher of Nature, Scientific American, and other august and popular journals, attempting to induce authors who sign with it to obtain waivers on the open access policies of their schools and institutions, it is also slipping waivers on authors' moral rights into its contracts. And just to clarify, moral rights "include the right of attribution, the right to have a work published anonymously or pseudonymously, and the right to the integrity of the...

CILIP confirms libraries endorsement of new UK intellectual property rules
April 2, 2014 | 10:30 am

copyrightThe Chartered Institute of Library & Information Professionals (CILIP) has just added its overall endorsement to the new changes to UK copyright law, confirming the overall positive reception of the new rules from library professionals. In a CILIP-hosted briefing on the issue, Annie Mauger, CILIP Chief Executive, said: "The Libraries & Archives Copyright Alliance, supported by CILIP, have worked tirelessly for over twenty years advocating for much-needed reform ... The reforms are extremely good news for the library and information profession and all the people that use our services. We will continue to work closely with the Intellectual Property Office...

UK police advertise illegal websites
April 1, 2014 | 1:55 pm

Flag of Edward EnglandWell alright, that's not exactly what's going on. But it could have that effect. For the UK Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (PIPCU), siloed in the City of London Police, has announced with some fanfare the launch of its "Infringing Website List (IWL) ... [which] sets out to disrupt the advertising revenues on illegal websites globally." The principle of this initiative is to introduce "an online portal providing the digital advertising sector with an up-to-date list of copyright infringing sites, identified by the creative industries and evidenced and verified by the City of London Police unit, so that advertisers, agencies and...

British Library IP head details impact of new UK copyright rules
March 31, 2014 | 6:25 pm

librariesBenjamin White, Head of Intellectual Property at the British Library, has produced an extremely detailed guide to the implications of the changes of UK copyright law for libraries and for the general public in Britain. And this guide has been made available through the website of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), who have of course an immediate professional interest in the topic. "The proposed drafts go a significant way towards making UK copyright law 'format neutral', meaning that the law will now recognise for example that those doing research and personal study are just as likely to...

UK intellectual property review frees up copying, parody
March 31, 2014 | 2:20 pm

The UK government has introduced a series of changes to copyright law across various media, including books. "These changes will affect how you can use content like books, music, films and photographs," says the introductory text at the UK Intellectual Property Office. "They will also introduce greater freedoms in copyright law to allow third parties to use copyright works for a variety of economically and/or socially valuable purposes without the need to seek permission from copyright owners." These remove the UK's anomalous legal restrictions on, for instance, ripping CDs and DVDs for backup and private home use, and open up...

Heald study shows books lag behind music in out-of-print digitization
March 20, 2014 | 12:35 pm

Professor Paul J. Heald of the University of Illinois College of Law has just released a new study that puts Chris Meadows's recent problems with out-of-print stories from Astounding Stories into perspective. Remember that it was Heald whose previous research found that extension of copyright terms actually reduced the availability of books. And his new report, "The Demand for Out-of-Print Works and Their (Un)Availability in Alternative Markets," has found that, while demand for out-of-print books as ebooks or in other forms remains high, supply remains atrocious in comparison to older musical works. Heald compares the availability of popular songs and music...

James Joyce and the public domain situation
February 3, 2014 | 2:25 pm

The anniversary of James Joyce's birthday in 1882, February 2nd, fell on a Sunday this year, so this article comes a day late. And as his life and works have already been covered plenty on TeleRead, and are best tackled on Bloomsday, June 16th, I'll confine this article to the question of Joyce's works and the public domain, since for some jurisdictions, these towering classics of modernist literature are available online for free - and for some, they're not. Just to spare anyone who is more interested in the works themselves than the wrinkles of this debate, all of James Joyce's...

LSE study suggests creative industries don’t gain from copyright enforcement
October 8, 2013 | 10:20 am

The Department of Media and Communications at the UK's prestigious London School of Economics has just released a policy brief, entitled "Copyright & Creation: A Case for Promoting Inclusive Online Sharing," which suggests that policy-makers and Big Media are gaining little from their efforts to enforce heavy and restrictive copyright rules. Online piracy, in fact, could bring more benefit than harm to the creative sector. "Evidence does not support claims about overall revenue reduction due to individual copyright infringement," claims the brief, in its introduction. "The experiences of other countries that have implemented punitive measures against individual online copyright infringers indicate...

UK House of Commons Committee seeks rape, murder-league penalties for online piracy
October 4, 2013 | 2:00 pm

The Culture, Media and Sport Committee of the UK House of Commons has just released its latest responses to the Independent Review of Intellectual Property and Growth commissioned by the current UK government in 2010 from Professor Ian Hargreaves (the so-called Hargreaves Review) and completed in 2011. And among its overwhelmingly negative conclusions, and its recommendations, it recommends "that the maximum penalty for serious online copyright theft be extended to ten years' imprisonment." According to the latest UK figures available (2011) from the Ministry of Justice, the average custodial sentence for rape "was in excess of eight and a half years,"...

Does copyright still help hold back Martin Luther King’s dream?
August 29, 2013 | 10:08 am

The 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's march on Washington seems a good time to resurrect, as many columnists have, the controversy over the copyright status of his "I have a dream" speech, delivered 50 years ago yesterday on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. The conundrum was typified by the 1999 court case Estate of Martin Luther King, Jr., Inc. v. CBS, Inc., which hinged on whether the speech had gone into the public domain by being broadcast. King's estate held that it hadn't. The parties settled out of court, so a final judicial ruling was never made, but the...

Copyright actually makes books disappear, according to study
July 6, 2013 | 6:00 pm

You've long suspected it, and now here's an academic study to prove it: Copyright actually makes books disappear. "A random sample of new books for sale on Amazon.com shows three times more books initially published in the 1850’s are for sale than new books from the 1950’s. Why? This paper presents new data on how copyright seems to make works disappear," runs the abstract of the study, How Copyright Makes Books and Music Disappear (and How Secondary Liability Rules Help Resurrect Old Songs), by Professor Paul J. Heald (pictured at left), of the University of Illinois College of Law, and visiting professor at...

Europe’s Database Right: A scary concept
February 13, 2013 | 5:48 pm

Techdirt has a write-up on something I had never heard of--a special copyright introduced in 1996 which protects the contents of databases, even if all the works they list are public domain. The case Techdirt profiles involves a company which wanted to obtain some government records from the 1700s and 1800s and were told they could not: "In order to justify an exclusive right to its database, the department of Vienne told the court it had "committed more than €230,000 [about $300,000] to this project and that the digitization of documents archive had taken eight years." This is a scary story for...