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Posts tagged Congress

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Public Knowledge, John Villasenor, The Software Alliance (BSA)
June 4, 2014 | 7:31 am

Previously in this series: House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Graphic Artists Guild, Owners’ Rights Initiative House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Matthew B. Glotzer, New York Public Library Here’s the last batch (so far) of documents from the first sale House subcommittee hearing. If any additional material becomes available, I’ll pick that up down the line. Public Knowledge The first document for this entry comes from Sherwin Siy,...

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Matthew B. Glotzer, New York Public Library
June 3, 2014 | 12:14 pm

Previously in this series: House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Graphic Artists Guild, Owners’ Rights Initiative This post continues a theme from the last couple, in which one side’s statement is for preserving/extending first sale, and the other is against it. Which is kind of stretching a point, given that the “pro” post really isn’t about digital resale and the con post isn’t against physical resale, but still, I take what I can get. This time...

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: Graphic Artists Guild, Owners’ Rights Initiative
June 3, 2014 | 5:04 am

oriPreviously in this series: House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi Here are two more documents from yesterday’s first sale hearing. Like yesterday’s pair, they’re a half-and-half split: one in favor of expanding first sale, the other concerned over what the implications might be. We begin with the concerned one. Graphic Artists Guild Writing on behalf of the Graphic Artists Guild, Ed Shems explains graphic artist concerns over the possible expansion of fair use in a 5-page PDF. Graphic artists, Shems explains, frequently license their work rather than selling it outright. This allows them to tailor their fees...

House first sale doctrine hearing written testimony: John Wiley & Sons, ReDigi
June 2, 2014 | 4:54 pm

We’ve covered the history of efforts to implement resale of digital goods before (more than once, in fact), and there’s been quite a discussion of why it would be a bad idea. Now it’s Congress’s turn to talk about it. Today a House subcommittee held a hearing concerning first sale and how it related to digital items. InfoDocket has links to the prepared remarks of a number of the attendees, as well as the opening statement by Representative Bob Goodlatte. Noting the importance of the first sale doctrine, Goodlatte said Although some legal doctrines...

Supreme Court rules Congress can remove material from public domain to comply with international treaty obligations
January 19, 2012 | 1:52 am

The Supreme Court yesterday issued a ruling on the Golan copyright case which we’ve discussed here a few times before. The case involved whether works that had previously been within the public domain in the USA could be taken back out of it in order to comply with the Berne Convention international copyright treaty. Disappointingly, the court ruled that Congress could indeed remove the works from the public domain—Congress did have the power to retroactively extend copyright on these works in order to bring the US into treaty compliance. The court rejected the idea that the First Amendment...

SOPA not dead yet – keep fighting!
January 17, 2012 | 10:13 pm

Lest we thought that SOPA was dead and buried, a couple of further developments today have shown that hope is premature. Bill sponsor Lamar Smith is moving ahead with plans to continue marking the bill up and bring it back to the House agenda in February. The DNS blocking provision will be removed from the bill (for now—that doesn’t keep them from trying to add it back after the furor has died down), but it still contains a number of other provisions that could prove harmful to the freedom that is the lifeblood of the Internet. Meanwhile, former Senator...

Wikipedia, reddit, Mozilla to black out sites Wednesday in protest of SOPA legislation
January 17, 2012 | 11:40 am

A number of websites are going dark tomorrow to protest the SOPA legislation that could impose harsh restrictions upon the Internet. These sites include Mozilla, reddit for 12 hours, and Wikipedia for a full 24 hours. Google will also place a SOPA-related link on its homepage. Wales explained that the Wikipedia blackout comes as a result of feedback from the Wikipedia community, Not everybody is sanguine about the blackout. On just-launched Silicon Valley news site Pando Daily, Paul Carr writes in agreement with Twitter CEO Dick Costolo’s tweet calling the decision “foolish”. Carr blasts Wales for “[making] a...

Scribd self-censors to stop SOPA
December 21, 2011 | 11:13 pm

Wikipedia isn’t the only site considering a public demonstration of the evils of SOPA. Scribd has gone ahead and done it. Scribd has added a script to its page that blanks out documents word by word before users’ eyes, followed by a pop-up explaining what’s happening and why we should all be concerned about SOPA. This analysis of why SOPA is unconstitutional is cited as an example. (At least, in theory. It didn’t work on my computer, nor on those of some others who posted comments on Scribd’s post.) That puts me in mind of a tool I...

Should Congress and the Internet understand each other better?
December 20, 2011 | 12:07 am

Congress_large_extra_largeAn interesting triad of articles has appeared over the last few days, talking about Congress’s deliberations over SOPA. The article that started it all, by musician and blogger Joshua Kopstein, puts into its title a sentiment with which a lot of people on the Internet can readily agree: “Dear Congress, It’s No Longer OK to Not Know How the Internet Works.” Kopstein calls members of Congress out for not bothering or apparently even desiring to understand the impact that their legislation could have before passing it. A couple of representatives pooh-poohed security concerns that had been brought up about...

Electronic device use coming to House of Representatives
December 26, 2010 | 3:20 pm

Seal-of-the-US-House-of-RepresentativesIn a follow-up to a story I mentioned several days ago, the New York Times has coverage of the new rules propositions for allowing electronic device use on the House floor. It seem these propositions will just formalize the way that people have already been using their devices—rules or not, Representatives and Senators are often seen furtively whipping out their gadgets to check messages. The new rules are not meant to allow let congressmen listen to music or play games, though undoubtedly some will find less serious uses for the devices. The intent, [Brendan...

U.S. Representatives seek permission to use iPads on House floor
December 20, 2010 | 3:38 pm

A few days ago I mentioned the uses that a couple of Supreme Court Justices were making of e-readers or iPads. It turns out that this is not the only place in government where the electronic devices might be used—but some existing rules of conduct might have to be cleared out of the way first. Politico reports on the drive to modernize technological aspects of Congress, whose facilities are still somewhat technologically backward. The iPad has been finding favor with representatives, particularly Republican ones. Indeed, when Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) got one of the first...

Consumer advocate Rick Boucher loses congressional seat, DRM researcher Ed Felten joins the FTC
November 5, 2010 | 1:50 am

boucher Recent days have brought both bad news and good news out of Capitol Hill on the intellectual property front. In the bad news, Representative Rick Boucher (D-VA), chair of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet, whom we’ve mentioned many times here on TeleRead for his enlightened stance on consumers’ digital rights, lost his bid for re-election. Hopefully there will be other congressmen who share Boucher’s points of view. But there is also some unexpectedly good news. The FTC has appointed its first ever Chief Technologist, and they could not possibly have chosen a better man...