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Posts tagged bookstore

The French get exceptionally stupid
June 5, 2013 | 1:00 pm

the FrenchThe French state has launched its latest battle against change and reality with an attack on Amazon, with Aurélie Filippetti, the Minister for Culture and Communication in the embattled government of President Francois Hollande, castigating the U.S. giant for “dumping” in France. And tellingly, she had to use the Anglicism for the practice, despite endless initiatives from her own department and elsewhere to stamp out Franglais in France. Labeling Amazon the “destroyer” of bookshops, Filippetti claimed that the company abuses its position to artificially lower book prices to create a situation of quasi-monopoly, only to raise them again once competition is extinguished. The positive...

Reports of the Bookstore’s Death Are Greatly Exaggerated
May 13, 2013 | 8:50 pm

Reports of the bookstore's death are greatly exaggeratedBy Michael Weinstein There’s been a great deal of conjecture lately about the future of the bookstore: What will happen to the B&N stores (especially if they do plan to reduce the number of stores)? What about independent bookstores? Will Amazon crush bricks-and-mortar stores out of existence? Oh, lordy, will there even be such a thing as a bookstore!?!? Not surprisingly, this all made me think of a song. Under time pressure to have a song for the first Earth Day concert in 1970, the great Tom Paxton created the gold standard for songs about ecology when he wrote “Whose Garden Was...

Meet Waterstones Academy, a college for booksellers
February 25, 2013 | 12:30 pm

Waterstones AcademyThe Bookseller recently published what appears to be a very interesting article about a sort of bookseller's university that Waterstones—the UK-based bookstore chain—plans to open at some point in the near-to-distant future. And I use the term "appears," by the way, because the article in question in available only to subscribers of the website's premium content, of which I am not one. Bummer. The article's abstract, at any rate, claims that Waterstones Academy, as the school will be known, will be an "industry first" in the UK. Students of the nine month-long program, which will be operated in partnership with the...

Pay to play: Would you pay to browse for books?
February 12, 2013 | 2:00 pm

Would you pay to browse a bookstore's shelves? Victoria Barnsley, CEO of HarperCollins UK & International, discussed that concept during a recent interview on BBC's The Bottom Line with Evan Davis. "In America, certain shoe shops are charging to try on shoes. These people just go in, try them on and go and order them online,” Barnsley said. “I think the idea of a bookshop becoming a book club is not that insane, actually. You actually pay for the privilege of browsing.” Pay to browse. In a bookshop. [caption id="attachment_78843" align="alignright" width="161"] Victoria Barnsley, HarperCollins UK and Int'l CEO[/caption] The idea seemed crazy coming out of...

A girl walks into a bookstore and asks for help…
July 27, 2012 | 10:36 pm

tgwtdtFound this amusing little anecdote over on Not Always Right, the site where people post their stories of hilarious encounters with rude or obnoxious customers, and chuckled for quite a while afterward. It begins innocently enough: (A customer walks into the bookstore and begins looking around.) Me: “Hello! Is there anything I can help you find today?” Customer: “Yes, there is this book that I heard about on the radio that I want to read.  I can’t remember the title, though.” Me: “Alright, do you know...

Nook news: Sale, market cap, and NFC chips
May 2, 2012 | 2:19 am

In honor of Mother’s Day, Barnes & Noble has chopped $20 off the price of its (non-glowlit) Nook Simple Touch, which can now be had for $79, and the Nook Color, which is now $149. The sale lasts until May 12th. This deal makes the Nook cost the same as Amazon’s ad-supported Kindle, but without the ads—currently the lowest price for a non-refurbished e-ink reader. Meanwhile, if you’d ever wondered just how big this e-book thing was really getting. GigaOm reports that, with Microsoft’s recent investment in Barnes & Noble’s Nook subsidiary, the subsidiary is currently valued at $1.7...

Bookstore, or Retail Ecosystem? by Ted Striphas
March 14, 2012 | 8:52 am

Late age pbk I’m on the road right now, so unfortunately I don’t have time to compose a blog post of the usual length. But since I promised last week that there’d be new content here, now, I figured it would be worth sharing a few thoughts about something that’s been on my mind lately. I’m talking about Barnes & Noble, the beleaguered bookstore chain that was, until recently, practically synonymous with bookselling in the United States. Specifically, I’ve been thinking a lot about the books you see immediately upon entering any Barnes & Noble bookstore — the ones featured in the displays right...

The 20 most beautiful bookstores in the world
March 9, 2012 | 9:43 am

Barts This is quite a collection, as compiled by Flavorwire.  Check it out: With Amazon slowly taking over the publishing world and bookstores closing left and right, things can sometimes seem a little grim for the brick and mortar booksellers of the world. After all, why would anyone leave the comfort of their couch to buy a book when with just a click of a button, they could have it delivered to their door? Well, here’s why: bookstores so beautiful they’re worth getting out of the house (or the country) to visit whether you need a...

Maine bookstore chain Mr. Paperback closing its doors
February 27, 2012 | 3:12 am

BangorAnother bookstore chain is biting the dust—this one a small regional chain with ten locations in Maine. Mr. Paperback has been around for over 50 years, but is closing its doors by the end of April. The store’s sister company, a magazine and newspaper distributor called Magazines Inc., is being bought out. Mr. Paperback’s 80 employees and Magazines Inc.’s 40 employees will be laid off. [Co-owner Penny] Robichaud said changes in the book industry and finances were the reasons for closing. “It’s due to gas prices and a changing industry — Amazon, the...

Amazon soon to open boutique store in Seattle, say anonymous sources
February 7, 2012 | 12:58 am

Remember that Amazon retail store rumor from a few days ago? Well, Good E-Reader has heard more from anonymous “Amazon sources close to the situation.” According to their sources, Amazon is going to roll out a retail store in Seattle within the next few months to test the waters and see if a chain of such stores could be profitable. “They intend on going with the small boutique route with the main emphasis on books from their growing line of Amazon Exclusives and selling their e-readers and tablets,” Good E-Reader’s Michael Kozlowski writes. As a small boutique,...

Billy Ray Cyrus to publish memoirs with Amazon
February 3, 2012 | 12:27 pm

brcDon’t tell my Nook, my achey breaky Nook… Billy Ray Cyrus, singer of a particularly overplayed country song and father of Miley “Hannah Montana” Cyrus, has landed a book deal with Amazon’s publishing arm for his memoirs, GalleyCat reports. Publication date is expected to be spring 2013 in both hardcover and e-book editions. The deal was brokered by Trident Media CEO Dan Strone, who also arranged the $800,000 deal for Penny Marshall’s memoirs. As that anonymous publishing insider lamented a few weeks ago, Amazon is lining up some pretty big names for its publishing arm. What with...

Is There Hope for Barnes & Noble?
January 30, 2012 | 9:21 am

Images As readers of my columns know, Amazon is not my favorite bookseller. It is not because Amazon doesn’t offer value or quality service; it is because I fear Amazon’s attempts to monopolize the book marketplace vertically, that is, everything from acquiring and publishing to selling exclusively. Right now consumers, especially ebookers, are happy with everything Amazon because the prices are lower, the selection is existentially broader, and the customer service is great (especially as Amazon is more interested in market share than profit from the book division). But will all that change should Barnes & Noble follow Borders into the...

Lessons learned from opening a bookstore
January 25, 2012 | 7:32 pm

On Open Salon, blogger jlsalthre posts a wry list of 25 things she learned from opening a bookstore. While most of them are observations about what kinds of people buy what kinds of print books, there are a few that show a rather pointed awareness of the electronic medium and the effects it is having: 1.  People are getting rid of bookshelves.  Treat the money you budgeted for shelving as found money.  Go to garage sales and cruise the curbs. 2.  While you're drafting that business plan, cut your projected profits in half. ...

Amazon doesn’t care about your local bookstore, says Tim Carmody
December 16, 2011 | 2:28 pm

Images Here's the beginning of a thoughtful article by Tim Carmody in Wired's Epicenter.  The rest of it is well worth reading: Here are two surprising holiday shopping season success stories. They’re even more surprising because they seem to directly contradict each other. First, Amazon, which has historically kept its sales figures for Kindle e-readers tightly under wraps, announced that it’s sold more than a million Kindle devices each week for the past three weeks. Priced between $79 for the new entry-level Kindle and $199 for the Kindle Fire tablet, that’s hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue every week for the Kindle division,...

E-Books, Shmee-Books: Readers Return to the Stores « INFOdocket
December 14, 2011 | 9:17 am

Download From The New York Times: Facing economic gloom and competition from cheap e-readers, brick-and-mortar booksellers entered this holiday season with the humblest of expectations. But the initial weeks of Christmas shopping, a boom time for the book business, have yielded surprisingly strong sales for many bookstores, which report that they have been lifted by an unusually vibrant selection; customers who seem undeterred by pricier titles; and new business from people who used to shop at Borders, the chain that went out of business this year. Barnes & Noble, the nation’s largest bookstore chain, said that comparable store sales this Thanksgiving weekend increased 10.9...

Internet book buyers still go to bookstores to make their choices
December 6, 2011 | 10:14 am

Screen Shot 2011 12 06 at 10 14 09 AM Good article today in Melville House's Moby LIves blog.  Here's part of it: The other half of my contention is that one reason it’s gotten this way is that reporting on the industry has tended to follow trends at the cost of reporting reality. Thus, as I pointed out in a MobyLives post a few months ago, the demise of Borders was treated as a trend story, the trend being that ebooks are cooler than print books and people were thus losing interest in print books, instead of a business story, whereby Borders had simply been badly managed and all signs were...

Bookstore sells book subscriptions with personalized recommendation service
November 22, 2011 | 11:55 pm

justtherightbookOn Publishing Perspectives, Rachel Aydt has an interesting story about a bookseller who has decided to try to make use of the Internet in an unusual way to sell more books. Roxanne Coady, owner of R. J. Julia Booksellers in Madison, Connecticut, has a personalized reading recommendation and subscription service called Just The Right Book.com. The service works by having prospective readers take a survey to find out their tastes in reading, and then the bookstore staff selecting a personalized recommendation. Survey takers can then subscribe to a tiered subscription system, with prices ranging from $85 per year for...

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