Is Apple Big Bro now? CNET editor’s detective thriller banned from the App Store

image Apple once ran a classic TV commercial positioning the Mac against the evil Big Bro-ish types at IBM. But is Steve Jobs’ outfit playing BB now? It’s banned David Carnoy’s detective thriller, the very book about which I just wrote.

Here’s yet one more argument for technological openness in distribution, e-book format standards and other areas. Imagine iTunes being The Big Store for e-books without alternatives existing. For the sake of free expression, let’s hope that third-party apps like Stanza survive on the iPhone.

If I were with the Association of American Publishers or the American Library Association, I’d speak up.

imageYes, I can understand some kind of access controls if a book is ultra-explicit in sexual ways or others, but mightn’t Apple be overdoing it with its gripe over Carnoy’s language? Screenshot shows one of his word crimes. Granted, TeleRead is a school- and library-friendly site, but this story demands presentation of the specifics. I don’t see anything there beyond what you’d hear in a high school locker room.

Meanwhile, now that David C. has offered his 25 tips for self-published writers, the topic of the earlier TeleBlog post, maybe he can add a 26th. Get your e-book banned  by Apple to reap some extra publicity here and elsewhere.

Related: Gizmodo write-up.

The inevitable Solomon Scandals angle: I’ve got a scene where the protagonist playfully tickles a girlfriend’s nipple while they’re both in the shower. Will that send me to Apple Hell? Or how about the newsroom language? I really need to see if Twilight Times Books will submit Scandals to the App store so I, too, can enjoy a publicity boost. What’s next? Will the phrase “Banned by Apple” replace the old “Banned in Boston”?

2 Comments on Is Apple Big Bro now? CNET editor’s detective thriller banned from the App Store

  1. Yes, I can understand some kind of access controls if a book is ultra-explicit in sexual ways or others, but mightn’t Apple be overdoing it with its gripe over Carnoy’s language?

    While I do think it’s disingenuous to write a specific post to say that SOME books maybe might oughtta be banned from the iApp store, but not THIS BOOK because it’s not dirty like that, I do agree with the larger principle. Why?

    THE PROVISO’s iApp store application rejected.

    Mine DOES have sexual content, but that’s not why it was banned from the iApp store. It was because of the F-bomb.

    Honestly, though, I don’t know why this is a surprise. Jobs has always been of the opinion that people don’t read, so instead of taking a market share in e-books like he did in music, he’s just going to fluff the whole thing off. He hasn’t changed in that position, up to and including all the workarounds to get e-books on iPhone/iTouch.

    Solution: Stanza and EPUB.

  2. I think, David, you are taking the wrong approach: You should view this positively and as the first in what will be a series of revivals of the decency leagues that proliferated in the 1920s and 1930s. With their revival, authors will be able to once again make a fair wage for their work because “banned in Boston” will spike sales everywhere else. And who better than Steve Jobs and Apple to begin the revival? Anything Jobs and Apple do makes news and spreads like wildfire. (All with tongue in cheek.)

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