4

image I’ve said it before. When you buy a DRMed book, you’re really just renting—say good-bye to the traditional first sale doctrine, like it or not. And it isn’t just the DRM. It’s also the terms of use. Check out Amazon Kindle and Sony Reader locked up: Why your books are no longer yours, in Gizmodo—picking up observations from the Columbia University Law School’s Science and Technology Review.

So, as folks are wondering, what happens when all your books exist only as bits inside a $20-a-month Google locker? Meanwhile is it misleading and perhaps even legally unenforceable for e-stores to say they’re “selling” you a DRMed file? Scholars are debating such issues, although in the end, I suspect, corporate executives’ political donations will settle all—unless, of course, Larry Lessig can somehow turn things around.

 
4