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Nook-TabletIf you’re getting a Nook Tablet, don’t expect to have access to much of its 16 gigabytes of onboard memory. Maximum PC reports (based on an Engadget review) that only 1 gigabyte of onboard storage is accessible to users. The other 13 or so gigs (that aren’t taken up by the operating system) can only be used for content downloaded from Barnes & Noble (though users can plug an SD card into the tablet and get access to more storage that way).

Gizmodo checked with B&N and was told that the measure was intended to prevent customers from loading up their devices with lots of movies and music and then discovering that apps and magazines they wanted to buy wouldn’t fit. I guess it emphasizes the fact that, as far as B&N is concerned, they’re not selling you a tablet—they’re selling you a way to consume the media they also sell. (So is Amazon, of course, though it goes about it in a different way.)

It’s not exactly a new development, though—back in May, B&N revised its Nook Colors to feature the same 1-gig storage restriction. The Kindle Fire doesn’t have that restriction on its own 8 GB of storage, of course—but it doesn’t have an SD card slot, either, so 8 is all you get.

 
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