Follow us on
Connect
More on TechnologyTell: Gadget News | Apple News

Publishing

Judge Cote certifies consumer suits for class action in Apple antitrust case
March 29, 2014 | 7:45 am

Calling it a “paradigmatic antitrust class action,” Judge Denise Cote has granted class-action certification to the consumers whose suit against Apple makes up one third of the intricate bundle of cases she is presiding over in the Apple antitrust trial. (The other two thirds are, of course, the actions brought by the Department of Justice and the state attorneys general.) She also denied Apple’s request to disregard the plaintiff’s damage expert, and threw out the opinions of the experts Apple had consulted in regard to damages. Not many surprises there for anyone who’s been following the trial so far. ...

Genre lines: Why literary writers won’t self-publish
March 29, 2014 | 5:58 am

jetpackI just happened to sit down and read the Robert McCrum article on struggling literary fiction authors that Paul covered earlier this month. It was interesting enough, and I’m don’t think I have substantively anything more to say about the content of the article itself than Paul did. But I was intrigued by a couple of the comments. Paul Bowes suggests that the reason literary writers can’t or don’t want to self-publish is a genre thing. Guardian Books, and the literary world generally, have a tendency to conflate 'writing' with literary fiction: or at least, with literary fiction and the kind of...

Who is more relevant now: BookExpo America or GenCon?
March 28, 2014 | 7:29 pm

avenue-close-up Earlier today, Susan wrote about Book Expo America adding a celebrity author convention this year. I find this interesting, but I wonder what they're trying to prove here. Not many of those celebs are known for being writers; they're celebs who are also writers. (Martin Short? Angelica Huston? Really?) And even the ones who are writers, like Grisham and Stan Lee (who didn’t even write for a book publisher to begin with), became so famous for their writing that now they’re more famous for being famous. Why don’t they just drop all pretense and get Snooki in...

Verso announces ebook bundling direct sales model
March 28, 2014 | 4:25 pm

Verso Books, "the largest independent, radical publishing house in the English-speaking world," has announced a new direct sales model from its website "in a way that will shake up how publishers relate to their readership, and help to support independent publishing. For all new titles and hundreds of recent ones, Verso will bundle the corresponding ebook with every print copy purchased, and offer free postage to anywhere in the world." Verso lists off its partners in the new platform, including "developers Fastest Crayon, payment provider Braintree, social DRM publisher Booxtream, and Verso¹s distributors ­ Random House in the US and Marston in the...

Hodder picks up Quercus for a song
March 26, 2014 | 4:25 pm

Hachette UK imprint Hodder & Stoughton has acquired Quercus Publishing, hitherto mooted as a potential acquisition target for Amazon Publishing. And the price was a fairly minimal £12.6 million ($20.8 million). The full text of the cash offer document, available online here, states that: "Quercus is an international publisher with offices in London and New York.  Quercus specialises in commercial fiction, non-fiction and children's publishing in digital and print formats and incorporates the MacLehose Press, Jo Fletcher Books and Heron Books imprints. On 17 January, 2014, Quercus released its interim trading statement for the financial year ended 31 December, 2013, in...

Robert Aickman again as Faber announces long-awaited reprints
March 26, 2014 | 10:24 am

The legacy of great, and greatly neglected, British horror and dark fiction writer Robert Aickman (1914-1981) has languished without mass market publication for many years. Tartarus Press carries a superb, but unfortunately expensive and hard to come by, series of hardback reprints of his original short story collections, and Faber Finds published three volumes of stories, both reprint collections and original recompilations, in 2008. Now, though, Faber has announced "the publication of four new editions in B format of the ‘strange stories’ of Robert Aickman – widely regarded as the twentieth century’s greatest English writer of supernatural stories – to...

Will Atavist Books really ‘revolutionize book publishing’?
March 26, 2014 | 8:19 am

sleepdonationPolicyMic has an article looking at a “digital platform that’s about to revolutionize book publishing.” I have my doubts. The platform is actually none other than The Atavist, which we’ve covered a few times since it was launched a couple of years back. It started out as a multimedia-enabled e-magazine for long-form journalism, which it still largely is. But it’s decided to bring its multimedia and interactivity chops to the world of books, too, by publishing an interactive, web-enabled version of a fiction book first, then bringing out a “hybrid” print book—“a paperback with the production quality of a...

PW shares fast-growing indie publishers list: Not many dead
March 25, 2014 | 6:25 pm

Think that self-publishing, Amazon and ebooks between them are conspiring to kill off the brave independent publisher? Think again. Publishers Weekly recently shared its breakdown of the "11 companies that made PW’s list of fast-growing independent publishers in 2013," comprehensively demonstrating that there is no sense scapegoating Amazon for the state of the publishing sector. And its rundown also highlights some handy points on what it takes for indie publishers to survive and thrive in these digitally disrupted times. First in line, Oak Press LLC, which started as the personal platform of romance writer Bella Andre, "reported a spike in revenue...

Guardian stops ebook bashing, details benefits to small publishers
March 19, 2014 | 2:13 pm

small publishers[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="443"] Do it the Caxton way.[/caption] For an organization with an apparent anti-ebook and anti-Amazon animus, The Guardian seems to have had something of a change of heart. A long article in its Guardian Small Business Hub section, by Alison Coleman, under the title "Small publishers are benefiting from changes in the industry," demonstrates the benefits and opportunities of the new post-disruption publishing world for smaller and independent presses. "The world of publishing was once the preserve of very large organisations, huge publishing houses with massive production infrastructures and costs, that kept smaller niche publishers on the fringes, struggling...

Wylie versus Amazon: Idiotic jibes about idiocy
March 19, 2014 | 10:25 am

Long on invective, short on logic. That's how you want your book trade jackals to be, it seems. Especially when they make "millions off highbrow." Highbrow, eh: whoo, classy. Well, Andrew Wylie's brow certainly looks pretty high in the photo from Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung that graces his latest interview with the German journal about his views on Amazon's new German-language publishing program. This is the man, remember, who dismissed Amazon readers as "fools." And even shorn of the original venom by Goole Translate, he obviously hasn't got any nicer in the interim. He describes Amazon's publishing program as "characterized by...

Humble Bundle about to launch third e-book bundle
March 18, 2014 | 12:10 pm

The launch of the new Humble Bundle is still just under two hours away (until then, you have one last chance to snag some terrific Android games, nine of them for under $4—Zombie Gunship is some crazy fun!) but Publishers Weekly has just revealed what the new one is going to be. It’s going to be Humble’s first e-books and audiobooks bundle. It’s not entirely clear from the PW article which books will have audiobooks and which will just be e-books, but it’s going to include some great titles: the audiobook of Homeland by Cory Doctorow, financed by Doctorow...

Court finds in favor of HarperCollins over ‘Julie of the Wolves’ backlist e-book rights
March 18, 2014 | 11:47 am

We covered the HarperCollins vs. Open Road case a few months ago, over e-book editions of the late Jean C. George’s novel Julie of the Wolves. George signed a contract with Open Road to publish the e-book editions, arguing that there was no way her original 1971 contract with HC could cover e-books because they hadn’t even been invented yet. However, Andrew Albanese at Publishers Weekly reports that the district judge in the case has ruled in HarperCollins’s favor, finding HC’s interpretation of the contractual language convincing. The case came about when George wanted to publish an e-book edition...