Follow us on
Connect
More on TechnologyTell: Gadget News | Apple News

EPub

Pay what you want for two science-urban-fantasy books by Mercedes Lackey, Cody Martin
April 3, 2014 | 11:22 am

Reboots-FrontCovHere’s a mini-pay-what-you-want e-book bundle for this month: a pair of whimsical science-urban-fantasy novels from Mercedes Lackey and one of her Secret World Chronicle co-authors, Cody Martin. (I used to play City of Heroes with both of them.) The way it’s set up is, you can get the first book for free, or you can order both of them for a minimum of $1.99, suggested price of $3.99. I’ve read the first book; it’s highly amusing. The premise is pretty clever. It’s set in a science-fiction universe in which various supernatural critters—werewolves, vampires, zombies, etc.—have become useful in outer...

BookBale offers eight big-name SF titles in pay-what-you-want book bundle
November 3, 2013 | 9:25 pm

9-CitizenIt seems that the pay-what-you-want book bundle has been getting more popular lately. They’re popping up all over the place. Here’s one called “BookBale” that features a number of major-name authors and books. The pay-what-you-want has a minimum price of at least $2.99, and includes six books: The Jesus Incident by Frank Herbert & Bill Ransom Climbing Olympus by Kevin J. Anderson Birthright: The Book of Man by Mike Resnick Starplex by Robert J. Sawyer Future Perfect by Nancy Kress The Elvenbane by Mercedes Lackey & Andre Norton If you pay at least $10, you also get: The Hemingway Hoax by Joe Haldeman Citizen of the Galaxy by Robert Heinlein The...

First all-digital public library system a hit in Bexar County, Texas—with hundreds of e-reader gizmos and an eager young crew to explain them
October 20, 2013 | 1:11 pm

bibliotechLast year LibraryCity.org knocked the library system in Rockford, Illinois, for planning to spend around a quarter of its $1.19-million collection budget on e-books. A third of Rockfordians were living below the poverty line in 2009 by one estimate. And yet the local library initially wanted to start out with just 50 Kindle e-readers---hardly the best solution for people too poor or technophobic to buy and use e-book devices. The local NAACP and other groups yelled foul, just as they should have. So what’s happening down in Bexar County, Texas? BiblioTech, the world’s first all-digital public library system, opened there September 14...

Refurbished Nook Simple Touch: $40 on eBay
September 24, 2013 | 4:48 am

If you’re looking for a good cheap e-reader, an eBay seller is running a $40 with free shipping special on refurbished Nook Simple Touch units. This is B&N’s 2011 model, a 6” 800x600 unlit Pearl e-ink reader that can do EPUB, including Barnes & Noble’s and Adobe Digital Editions’ DRM. It has 2 GB of onboard storage, plus an SD card slot for loading more media. If you’re invested in Barnes & Noble’s content ecosystem (for example, you have a lot of e-books from eReader/Fictionwise that got imported to B&N after it shut those stores down), or just want something...

Free ePub Book Shows Potential of Local Librarians as Content-Providers (Video)
August 16, 2013 | 3:28 pm

librariansWhale Bombings, Pearl Harbor and Other Stories Enliven Q&A with Now-Dead Airman * * * Some unlucky whales died in certain stretches of the Pacific because inexperienced U.S. airmen mistook the long shapes in the water for Japanese submarines. More than a few offbeat recollections of this kind liven up an extended interview with the late Attilio F. Caporiccio, a B-17 crewman before and during World War II. The Q&A is now a free ePub book licensed under Creative Commons; just click on the link to download it. "Cappy" also recalled seeing the faces of Japanese pilots attacking Hickam Field—next to the Pearl Harbor naval base—because...

Baen places e-books in Sony store
August 9, 2013 | 11:06 pm

Fullscreen capture 892013 100234 PM.bmpAnother brief Baen update: Baen e-books have started appearing on the Sony e-book store. It’s hard to tell how many, because it’s apparently not possible to search by publisher, but a number of Baen David Weber, David Drake, and other titles have started to show up. Baen publisher Toni Weisskopf said on the Baen Bar that a press release had been approved and was supposed to go out today, though I don’t find any sign of it on Google News yet. The biggest surprise for me in all this is really that Sony is still selling e-books at all....

Canongate responds on EPUB correction for e-book formatting
July 29, 2013 | 11:53 am

CanongateFollowing my earlier review in TeleRead of Canongate's edition of "Things That Are" by Amy Leach, the publisher responded promptly to my comments there about the formatting in the EPUB edition, which in some cases left the page text split by the central gutter in landscape mode on a tablet. "Our conversion house's epubs include a page template that is applied to all pages inside the ebook and this is what's causing the text to be spread in one column across the two pages," Laura Kincaid, digital production controller at Canongate, told me. "It is an easy fix—removing the page template...

The Internet Archive’s Open Library is violating authors’ copyrights
July 10, 2013 | 8:53 pm

Open Library is a project of Brewster Kahle’s Internet Archive. We’ve written about Kahle, the Archive, and Open Library a few times, including some times I’d forgotten about. Kahle’s Internet Archive was first founded as a way to keep a historical record of the ever-changing Internet for the benefit of future sociological and cultural researchers; it later expanded into archiving other media as well. More recently, Kahle started collecting print books, and scanning them as well as archiving them; it was his intention to collect and save one of every print book ever published. These scanned books would also...

EPUB 3: DOA?
June 3, 2013 | 5:00 pm

EPUB 3Much back-and-forth debate has circulated recently about the latest iteration of the EPUB standard, EPUB 3—no surprise with IDPF Digital Book 2013, the International Digital Publishing Forum’s annual shindig, having just concluded in New York City. But whatever the merits of the standard, tardy implementation and half-hearted adoption is likely to stymie efforts to get the international publishing industry to … ahem … standardize on it. Just from the point of timing, some commentators put final rollout of EPUB3 at six to 12 months time … if adoption has any real meaning anyway. The European Booksellers Federation, for one, is supporting a high-level EU...

Flipick To Allow ePub3 from Adobe InDesign
February 7, 2013 | 10:30 am

E-book formatting is a challenge, as I've written about in previous posts. Later this month, Flipick is launching a tool that might make it easier. From their press release: Flipick is a new online service that allows book publishers and design shops to produce their own ePub3 compatible eBooks directly from within Adobe InDesign. This new service is quick, and capable of producing rich, informative and interactive text in an utmost cost-effective manner. Flipick is expected to be popular with publishers creating fixed-layout eBooks such as K-12 and scientific textbooks, storybooks and graphic novels in a format that dynamically adapts to disparate reading...

Latest Ars Technica OS X review has bumpy road to e-book release
July 25, 2012 | 6:59 pm

96693105Last year we covered Ars Technica publishing John Siracusa’s 27,000-word comprehensive review of OS X 10.7 Lion as an e-book, and the very successful sales numbers for a review that could still be read free on-line. This year, with the release of OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, Siracusa has done it again—but as the Nieman Journalism Lab reports, the process has not been without snafus. Since Mountain Lion was under NDA until the day it launched, that means that the e-book had to be submitted to Amazon at the same time the article was allowed to be published online...

Thoughts on Scrivener from Charlie Stross and me
July 22, 2012 | 8:37 pm

Last week, author Charlie Stross posted his review of the process of writing using Scrivener, a specialized story-based word processor I’ve mentioned a few times. Stross has a good overview of the program’s strengths and weaknesses from the point of view of a professionally-published writer. The program’s biggest weakness, he finds, is that it essentially becomes useless at the point a novel is finished and submitted to the publisher—because the Word document output isn’t quite ideal for submission, and then the publisher will send revisions in the form of Word documents, and expect them to be processed accordingly. Since...